BESTSELLERS

THE MONOGRAM MURDERS by Sophie Hannah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
Despite the names and dates, this authorized sequel will remind you less of Christie, whose strengths are very different from Hannah's, than of the dozens of other pastiches of golden age detective fiction among which it takes its place. Read full book review >
ROBERT B. PARKER'S BLIND SPOT by Reed Farrel Coleman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
If the Parker estate keeps pouring new wine into old bottles, who'll be the next vintner? Mary Higgins Clark? Andrew Vachss? Janet Evanovich? Read full book review >

THE KING'S CURSE by Philippa Gregory

VERDICT: BORROW IT
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
Under Gregory's spell, we keep hoping history won't repeat itself. Read full book review >
THE WITCH WITH NO NAME by Kim Harrison
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
This is a glorious burst of high-pitched melodrama, epitomizing both the protagonist and her series. Read full book review >
THE CHILDREN ACT by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
McEwan, always a smart, engaging writer, here takes more than one familiar situation and creates at every turn something new and emotionally rewarding in a way he hasn't done so well since On Chesil Beach (2007). Read full book review >

OTIS AND THE SCARECROW by Loren Long
by Loren Long, illustrated by Loren Long

VERDICT: BORROW IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
Fans will enjoy this more cerebral Otis and might build a little empathy along the way. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >
THE TEACHER WARS by Dana Goldstein
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 2, 2014
Probably not likely to sway opponents of public education, whose numbers and influence seem to be growing, but Goldstein delivers a smart, evenhanded source of counterargument. Read full book review >
THE BONE CLOCKS by David Mitchell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014
If Thatcher's 1984 is bleak, then get a load of what awaits us in 2030. Speculative, lyrical and unrelentingly dark—trademark Mitchell, in other words. Read full book review >
RUMBLE by Ellen Hopkins

VERDICT: BORROW IT
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Readers devour Hopkins regardless, but this is strong and worthy. (Verse fiction. 14-18)Read full book review >
THE RULE OF THOUGHTS by James Dashner
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
An excellent franchise entry that proves planned series can be just as enjoyable as one-offs. (Science fiction. 12-16)Read full book review >
BROWN GIRL DREAMING by Jacqueline Woodson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 28, 2014
For every dreaming girl (and boy) with a pencil in hand (or keyboard) and a story to share. (Memoir/poetry. 8-12)Read full book review >
I AM MALALA by Malala Yousafzai
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 19, 2014
Though Yousafzai's memoir never transcends her story, that story is a powerful and inspiring one; supplemented by contextualizing information, it should pack quite a wallop. (glossary) (Memoir. 10-14)Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >