BESTSELLERS

ZEROES by Scott Westerfeld
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
In this series opener by three acclaimed authors, intriguing protagonists and cinematic powers will surely please adventure fans who don't mind an ensemble developed at the expense of the individual. (Science fiction. 13-15)Read full book review >
SIX OF CROWS by Leigh Bardugo
Kirkus Star

VERDICT: BUY IT
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
Cracking page-turner with a multiethnic band of misfits with differing sexual orientations who satisfyingly, believably jell into a family. (Fantasy. 14 & up)Read full book review >

DEEP SOUTH by Paul Theroux
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
An epically compelling travel memoir. Read full book review >
I'LL NEVER WRITE MY MEMOIRS by Grace Jones
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
Jones' recollections are a passionate reminder of the fabulous, decadent, and manic coupling of life and art. Read full book review >
SAVING CAPITALISM by Robert B. Reich
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 2015
Reich's overriding message is that we don't have to put up with things as they are. It's a useful and necessary one, if not likely to sway the powers that be to become more generous of their own volition. Read full book review >

THE HEART GOES LAST by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
As one of a small group of authors who won literary credibility for dystopian fiction, Atwood has taught her readers to expect better. Read full book review >
PRETTY GIRLS by Karin Slaughter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
Slaughter (Cop Town, 2014, etc.) is so uncompromising in following her blood trails to the darkest places imaginable that she makes most of her high-wire competition look pallid, formulaic, or just plain fake.Read full book review >
AFTER YOU by Jojo Moyes

VERDICT: BORROW IT
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 2015
Moyes is a Maeve Binchy for the 21st century, and she has the formula down pat: an understanding of family dynamics, a nod to social issues, plenty of moral uplift, and a sentimental streak, all buoyed by a rollicking sense of humor. Read full book review >
WALK ON EARTH A STRANGER by Rae Carson
Released: Sept. 22, 2015
The tepid, resolution-free ending beckons potential sequels. (author's note, dramatis personae) (Historical fantasy. 12-14)Read full book review >
THE SLEEPER AND THE SPINDLE by Neil Gaiman
Kirkus Star
by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Chris Riddell

VERDICT: BUY IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 22, 2015
If this book isn't quite a masterpiece, it's certainly a treasure, and that's more than enough. (Fairy tale. 11-18)Read full book review >
THE THING ABOUT JELLYFISH by Ali Benjamin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 22, 2015
A painful story smartly told, Benjamin's first solo novel has appeal well beyond a middle school audience. (Fiction. 12 & up)Read full book review >
CRENSHAW by Katherine Applegate

VERDICT: BORROW IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 22, 2015
Though the lessons weigh more heavily than in The One and Only Ivan, a potential disappointment to its fans, the story is nevertheless a somberly affecting one. (Fiction. 7-11)Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >