BESTSELLERS

FROSTBLOOD by Elly Blake

VERDICT: SKIP IT
Released: Jan. 17, 2017
A slow-burning, classic tale with too few fireworks at the end. (Fantasy. 13 & up)Read full book review >
THE LAST OF AUGUST by Brittany Cavallaro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017
This muddled mystery rests on elaborate machinations with disproportionate motivations, but the emotional odyssey should satisfy readers seeking a contemporary, teenage take on the Baker Street pair. (Mystery. 14 & up)Read full book review >

THE PLAYBOOK by Kwame Alexander
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 14, 2017
This will appeal to fans of Alexander's previous middle-grade novels as well as young sports fans. (Nonfiction. 10-12)Read full book review >
MIGHTY, MIGHTY CONSTRUCTION SITE by Sherri Duskey Rinker
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 14, 2017
Sure to be a hit with fans of the prior title even if they wonder about that odd-looking building. (Picture book. 2-5)Read full book review >
GUNMETAL GRAY by Mark Greaney
Kirkus Star

VERDICT: BUY IT
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017
At about 500 pages, this one is fat, fast, and fun. Clancy's spirit lives on. Read full book review >

HEARTBREAK HOTEL by Jonathan Kellerman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017
Entertaining as the conscientious excavation of ancient misdeeds is, it all ends up having disappointingly little to do with the motive and the culprit in the unlikely murder of the tale's most charming character. Read full book review >
LINCOLN IN THE BARDO by George Saunders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017
With this book, Saunders asserts a complex and disturbing vision in which society and cosmos blur. Read full book review >
WINTERSONG by S. Jae-Jones

VERDICT: SKIP IT
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017
Like fruit from the Goblin Market: luscious at first bite but ultimately overripe, cloying, and empty. (Fantasy. 14 & up)Read full book review >
DRAGON CAPTIVES by Lisa McMann

VERDICT: SKIP IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 7, 2017
An unfortunate revival. (Fantasy. 8-12)Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017
It's a story that requires lots of insider information of its own kind to write, and Kolhatkar handles the job well though without the narrative flair of Michael Lewis' kindred book Flash Boys. Read full book review >
UNIVERSAL HARVESTER by John Darnielle

VERDICT: BORROW IT
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017
A smart and rangy yarn: file under suspense, horror, and domestic drama. Read full book review >
MY (NOT SO) PERFECT LIFE by Sophie Kinsella
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017
A delightful and charming story that will appeal to Shopaholic fans. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >