EVERYTHING COLLEGE DIDN'T TEACH YOU ABOUT MONEY: Money Management for the Young Professional by Beth Brophy

EVERYTHING COLLEGE DIDN'T TEACH YOU ABOUT MONEY: Money Management for the Young Professional

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Short-take briefings to help fledgling professionals bring a measure of order--and purpose--to their financial affairs. Seven archetypal Yuppies, with differing careers, life styles, and attitudes toward money, serve as illustrative case studies within a relatively conventional how-to format, which concludes with the financial aspects of having children. Brophy, a business writer for USA Today, first suggests that the young and restless prepare realistic budgets that permit them to save 10 percent or so of their gross income (less any payments for outstanding education loans) to provide funds for investment as well as a cushion against loss of a job, or whatever. Stressing the need for systematic record-keeping, she inventories the ways tax liabilities can be kept to a minimum. She also surveys the deregulated financial-services scene, cautioning against buy-now/pay-later sprees that can wreck credit ratings, and reviews insurance protection of all kinds, along with the tradeoffs in buying or renting a home. In addition, there are risk/reward rundowns on three investment opportunities--money-market vehicles, bonds, and common stocks. Almost equally valuable are the tips on negotiating with employers for both starting salaries and severance packages. All in all: excellent value for this particular market.

Pub Date: June 5th, 1985
Publisher: St. Martin's