THE LOST REPUBLIC OF INDIAN STREAM by

THE LOST REPUBLIC OF INDIAN STREAM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A fictionalization of the events leading up to the signing of the Webster- Ashburton treaty in 1842 and the peculiar role played by the settlers of Indian Stream- this turns out to be stock drama that takes little advantage of an interesting segment of New England history. As it happened, the people who came to Indian Stream in northern New Hampshire were impressed by the lush country and later formed their own republic- in a controversy marked by the desires of Canada and the U.S. to gain the territory, and the wave of vandalism that came with the political quarrels. But as told here, the events are flat and unseasoned. Young Dan Dexter, a farmer's son, becomes a good friend of Luther Parker, leader and president of Indian Stream. But their talk has a self conscious staginess as they plot to trap a rustler; their desires and achievements a triteness that precludes suspense and fits all the characters into conventional mold as at last they see the value of becoming part of New Hampshire. Disappointing and corny. Eight to elevens too.

Pub Date: March 31st, 1955
Publisher: Dutton