BATS: Night Fliers by Betsey Maestro

BATS: Night Fliers

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Bat's aren't evil, just strange, and the bum rap they have received since day one is undeserved. To clear up some misconceptions: Bats do not attack humans, nor drink their blood; they are not filthy little creatures -- on the contrary, they are quite clean; and they don't carry rabies any more than any other animal. The Maestros get up close and personal with these nocturnal ramblers, cover their physiology and life cycle, explain their living and eating habits, unravel echolocation, and give a glimpse of a few of the more than 1,000 different bat species. What emerges is a, well, not exactly cute, but at least a fascinating, intelligent beast, sweetly mammalian, and more effective than DDT in controlling the insect population. The watercolor-and-pencil illustrations are smartly dramatic without getting sensational. An excellent introduction, told with warmth and care by Maestro (The Story of Money, 1993, etc.). Bats couldn't have asked for a better public relations effort. Have you hugged a bat today?

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1994
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Scholastic