THREE FOOLS AND A HORSE by Betty Baker

THREE FOOLS AND A HORSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In an appended note Betty Baker tells readers that the Foolish People were a tribe the Apaches made up so they could tell cautionary jokes about them to children; here she puts some of those jokes together for a little silly tale about the Foolish People's first encounter with a horse. When they see the ""fiat land men"" riding ""big animals"" they decide to win one by challenging one of the riders to a race with Little Fool, who will compete on foot; to the flat landers' surprise but not the Foolish People's, Little Fool wins. The next major problem is solved by Fool About who puts pine sap on the back of the new mount, then rides home a big man. Other people's bungling is always appealing to children first struggling with the printed word, and Glen Rounds gives these shaggy aborigines a universal goofiness.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1975
Publisher: Macmillan