THE WHITE QUEEN by Betty Baur

THE WHITE QUEEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Not as significant a book as the publisher's blurb might lead one to expect. This is not another Rebecca West, nor yet another Galsworthy. It is a picture of England suffering from growing pains, as the tragedy of Spain tugs at the consciences of some, at the imagination of others, and causes acute discomfort to the diehards and the conservatives who will have none of war. There is Deborah Abbott who has come from America to marry Richard, somewhat debonair son of a county family; there is Richard himself, who tries to fit himself into business, but hates it, who tries to make a good husband for Deborah, but bores her, and who wants to be a farmer despite his father's horror at the thought; and there is Richard's friend, Sam, who had always been in love with Deborah, from Cambridge days, who is deeply involved emotionally in the world problems and anxious to be a part of it. The first part of the book is more or less routine. The last part, when Deborah and Richard break with traditions, and Deborah goes to the Continent with Sam -- only to find this isn't enough -- is at least significant of changing moods, changing modes. But Deborah is never -- to me -- alive; always a lay figure on which the author drapes her ideas.

Publisher: Viking