THERE'S A RHINO IN THE ROSE BED, MOTHER by Betty & Jack Leslie-Melville

THERE'S A RHINO IN THE ROSE BED, MOTHER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The blithe English/American husband and wife team who are in the African safari business (mainly circa Kenya) are somewhat less breezy' and a shade less patronizing than in Elephants Have Right of Way (KR p. 1286, 1972). Here Betty, who narrates, makes a well-intentioned if flouncy attempt to explain Africa and Africans to the world. She's appalled by South Africa's apartheid and by Rhodesia -- though Lord knows what one can do about it. As for nationalism, it's understandable but the incessant tub-thumping is ""so boring."" There are brief historical sorties and simplified reviews of African hangups for capsule edification. But seriousness aside, there are those humorous happenings to lighten this white woman's burden: the servant who carried in the Boar's Head with an orange in his mouth and parsley in his ears; the bush craftswoman, untutored in the mysteries of scale drawings, who produced a teapot the size of dice. There are also jolly tales of mishaps on the lecture route as well as on safari. Mildly diverting, if rather confused.

Pub Date: Nov. 9th, 1973
Publisher: Doubleday