SAY THESE NAMES (REMEMBER THEM) by Betty Sue Cummings

SAY THESE NAMES (REMEMBER THEM)

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A quietly told, unobtrusively researched story of the ""second Seminole War"" in 1830s Florida, with the near-genocide of the Miccosukee Indians--seen through the eyes of a young woman of the tribe. The child See-ho-hee learns about her people's past from her grandmother: the arrival of encroaching whites; the broken treaties; the raiding and burning, the obliteration of villages. And though See-ho-hee's great-uncle, the fierce, wise leader Apayaka (a real historical personage), will be one of the few never to capitulate, See-ho-hee and her family move on and on, before the white tide--the women and children trying to ""settle,"" the men prepared for war and fighting despair. There will be brave battles, retreats, the scattering of the tribe, weakened by hunger and demoralization. Eventually Apayaka leads his dwindling family to the sanctuary of the Everglades and its labyrinthine waterways and lethally cutting grass. So, during the ordeals of her growing-up years, See-ho-hee's curiosity about whites turns to hatred and fury: she learns to use a gun and a scalping knife; she remembers the death of her exhausted mother (in childbirth), the shooting death of a friend who has left See-ho-hee with two little boys. And, with three little children, young widow See-ho-hee will have a long, punishing journey through the wilderness--to be reunited with Apayaka and remnants of her family in the Everglades, to complete her four years of mourning and find a new husband, to lose both brothers to a doomed fighting mission. . . and to see a final end to the war for her decimated people. A shameful episode in American history, reconstructed without much texture or depth--Cummings (Hew Against the Grain) is a veteran juvenile author--but with straightforward intensity.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1984
Publisher: Pineapple Press