JACKIE ROBINSON by Bill Roeder
Kirkus Star

JACKIE ROBINSON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

**Tops for sparkling biography, intelligent reporting and a quietly understated commentary on the disease of racial intolerance, this book is a must for young people. There is enough baseball ""inside"" to tempt the fan and biographical information about one of the game's outstanding stars -- boyhood in California, sports and study at UCLA, military service, a short period with a Negro baseball team in Kansas City, and discovery by Branch Rickey of the Brooklyn Dodgers. However, as the first Negro player to be admitted to the big leagues, Jackie Robinson led a double life- as a promising rookie and as a guinea pig in a sociological experiment. The intricate maneuvers of Rickey to prepare for the event which he had planned even before knowing of Robinson, the insults and tension Robinson had to face, and the inevitable bouts with institutionalized Jim Crow point up not only the courage of the man, but the tragic destructiveness of racial prejudice. Robinson's famous testimony before the Un-American Affairs Committee is included in its entirety. Should have special sales.

Pub Date: April 25th, 1950
Publisher: A. S. Barnes