Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 2)

HUSH NOW, BABY by Angela W. Williams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"An unabashedly emotional narrative that only occasionally requires readers to bushwhack through thick vines of memory."
An adoring view of a childhood nanny in Pinopolis, South Carolina, that does not disguise the ugly specter of 1950s segregation. Read full book review >
DAISY TURNER'S KIN by Jane C. Beck
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2015

"A well-excavated biography of a 'custodian of a multigenerational American family saga.'"
A deeply, patiently researched journey into the unusual English-African roots of a long-lived Grafton, Vermont, storyteller. Read full book review >

BEING BERLUSCONI by Michael Day
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 21, 2015

"As entertaining and shocking as one would hope for, but the book leaves readers with more questions than answers."
In the first comprehensive examination of former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's life and career, Independent Italy correspondent Day paints a lively but noncomplex picture of an ambitious and deeply flawed man in a system that accommodated his numerous vices.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"A fast-paced Vietnam War story that cheekily employs the pilots' vernacular as well as plenty of technological terminology."
Weapon wizardry and exciting, in-the-moment pilots' accounts comprise this homage to the group of first trackers of the pesky surface-to-air missiles during the Vietnam War. Read full book review >
THE SEVEN GOOD YEARS by Etgar Keret
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 16, 2015

"Gentle reflections on love, family, and heritage."
A writer's life amid tremors of war. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"A pleasure for students of modern history, especially useful for those seeking an introduction to the broad field of intellectual history. Barzun, Berlin, and Needham would likely argue at points, but this fits squarely in their tradition."
A broad survey of the ideas that have driven modern history since the 19th century—and on account of which millions of lives have been changed for good or ill. Read full book review >
NOTE BOOK by Jeff Nunokawa
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2015

"An engaging multimedia project offering even more food for thought when translated to the linearity of the printed page."
Literary-based reflections on and of the virtual age. Read full book review >
THE QUIET MAN by John H. Sununu
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 9, 2015

"For true believers only—and even they are going to have a hard time lasting through this dull book, which actually encourages more skepticism than it erases."
A droning, 400-page toast to George H.W. Bush. Read full book review >
ANCHOR AND FLARES by Kate Braestrup
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 14, 2015

"Braestrup delivers another appealing, tenderhearted memoir braiding faith and family."
An ordained Unitarian Universalist minister comes to terms with a son joining the Marines. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 2015

"Not for the fainthearted, but a good wake-up call for those concerned with decent treatment of animals and healthy food on the table."
A searing exposé of the brutal treatment animals receive on their ways to our dinner plates. Read full book review >
THE HOUSE IS FULL OF YOGIS by Will Hodgkinson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 5, 2015

"A sweet-and-sour account of a family that is unhappy in its own unique—and very amusing—way."
Adolescence meets enlightenment in this funny memoir, which details what happens to an awkward English teenager when his middle-class, middle-aged father decides to go Hindu. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 23, 2015

"A charming account of how 'to pursue opportunity and possibility where others see none.'"
A memoir about how the Internet can help in the fight against poverty, from the co-founder of Kiva, "the world's first personal microlending platform." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >