Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 94)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 5, 2002

"It may puzzle readers of Son of the Morning Star and fans of They Died with Their Boots On, but this is an intriguing addition to the Custer literature all the same."
An eccentric though highly readable blend of history, travelogue, and memoir that follows a wobbly trail behind George Armstrong Custer's globetrotting widow. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Inspirational reading for young women seeking careers in politics or nongovernmental organizations, and instructive for policy wonks of every stripe."
A consistently captivating memoir by a woman of apparently endless accomplishment. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 22, 2002

"Smart, evocative, and memorable: nature-writing done right."
Lyrical nature essays set mostly in the American Southwest, with excursions to the tropics to escape the desert sun. Read full book review >
47 ROSES by Peter Sheridan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2002

"An outrageous, scandalously good-humored tribute from a loving son."
The "other woman" surfaces at last and with a vengeance in this tour-de-force sequel to the author's applauded family memoir, 44: Dublin Made Me (1999). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 18, 2002

"Masterfully lucid and compelling; sure to be required reading in the Cicero canon."
Comprehensive, accessible survey of the personal and political life of lawyer, politician, philosopher, and crank Marcus Tullius Cicero. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 6, 2002

"An invigorating plunge into the sexual, intellectual, and artistic ferment of the enclave that nurtured 20th-century artists and writers whose work and lives still resonate in the 21st."
Longtime Village Voice theater editor Wetzsteon (1932-1998) celebrates with wit, insight, and love the political radicals, poets, painters, and just plain eccentrics who lived and worked in Greenwich Village during the first half of the 20th century. Read full book review >
EISENHOWER by Carlo D’este
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 4, 2002

"An absorbing portrait of the growth of Eisenhower the man and a fine analysis of the accomplishments of Eisenhower the general."
Exhaustive, highly readable study of Ike the soldier, from his modest Kansas origins through V-E Day. Read full book review >
FIREHOUSE by David Halberstam
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2002

"Fine work that will leave most readers with even higher esteem for firefighters."
Peeled emotional energy characterizes this portrait by Halberstam (War in a Time of Peace, 2001, etc.) of a firehouse that lost 12 of 13 men in the initial response to the World Trade Center attack. Read full book review >
BACK THEN by Anne Bernays
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2002

"Like a Porter melody, the recollections of these saucy, urbane lovers linger and prompt smiles of affection for a bygone era."
Novelist Bernays (Professor Romeo, 1989, etc.) and biographer Kaplan (Walt Whitman, 1980, etc.) follow up The Language of Names (1997) with another joint effort: a zesty intellectual memoir of starting out in the '50s. Read full book review >
THE TIGER LADIES by Sudha Koul
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 14, 2002

"A beautifully rendered, deceptively simple history of the personal and political."
Lyrical recollections of coming of age in Kashmir. Read full book review >
CONFESSIONS OF A STREET ADDICT by James J. Cramer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

Wall Street's most notorious bull bares all in this typically over-the-top memoir. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2002

"The tenacity and availability of life, amply admired and admirably evoked."
From newcomer Foster, a keen and wholly lovely catalogue of seasons growing spuds in the midst of swells. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >