Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 956)

THE PRIVATE PASSIONS OF BONNIE PRINCE CHARLIE by Hugh Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A stirring story of a lost but heroic cause."
A full-dress revisiting of a romantic figure from Scottish history. Read full book review >
TED POSTON by Kathleen A. Hauke
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A gem of a book on a remarkable person—and his age. (24 b&w photos, not seen)"
Reading Ted Poston's life story is akin to reading several small chapters in American history. Read full book review >

DAUGHTER OF THE RIVER by Hong Ying
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A major writer emerges here, combining flawlessly the often broken dreams of youth and the usually broken dream of politics. (Author tour)"
A memoir of growing up amid poverty in contemporary urban China—at once lyrical and brutal. Read full book review >
REMEMBERED RAPTURE by bell hooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"And she does. (Author tour)"
A moving testimony to passion for the written word, and to the inherent difficulties of becoming a purveyor of both language and ideas. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Stock up on Godiva and Goo-Goo Bars and be entertained by this substantial report, without sugar coating, on a surefire topic. (photos, not seen)"
Former Washington Post reporter Brenner expands a simple assignment into an inviting visit to candy land, a place dominated by the legacies of two very different corporate dictators. Read full book review >

LITTLE SISTERS by Carolyn Lieberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Precious and contrived—enough to give little sisters a bad name."
Another simplistic pigeonhole useful for any junior siblings who want to blame someone else for their own problems: the disadvantageous fate of being a little sister. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A solid study of a black woman activist confronting both racial discrimination and controversial questions of gender role. (17 halftones, 11 linecuts)"
A black woman's rise from orphanhood to activism demonstrates social politcs in America during the Reconstruction era. Read full book review >
THE ORCHID THIEF by Susan Orlean
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"As for everyone else, there's little or no narrative drive to keep all the facts and mini-narratives flowing. (Author tour)"
Expanded from a New Yorker article, this long-winded if well-informed tale has less to do with John Laroche, the "thief," than it does with our author's desire to craft a comprehensive natural and social history of what the Victorians called "orchidelirium." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"But Latifah delivers her insights with a biographical frankness (dealing with her struggles with abusive relationships and questions of self-worth) and salty directness that her young female fans (for whom the book seems to be written) are likely to find engaging and convincing. (Author tour)"
The successful actress and rap singer offers a frank, down-to-earth, but somewhat unsurprising review of the hard life lessons she has learned, about self-respect, love, and independence. Read full book review >
RIGOBERTA MENCHU AND THE STORY OF ALL POOR GUATEMALANS by David Stoll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Stoll's book is not an attempt to debunk Rigoberta's story, but to serve as a warning that elevating one version of history to cult status inevitably silences a multitude of others."
An anthropologist's (Middlebury Coll.) critical reexamination of the phenomenon of Rigoberta Mench£, the Guatemalan peasant awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"In its rough, raw vitality, his diary still gives testament to the lives that remained in his heart and the inspiration he quite literally drew from them."
A harrowing journal of lust, creativity, and privation by the painter, photographer, and performance artist who died in 1992 at the age of 37. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 14, 1998

"In sum, Thurmond emerges from this portrait as that rarity, a politician beloved by his constituents. (15 photos and illustrations)"
The life (so far) of a master politician who daily sets new records as the US Senate's oldest and longest-serving member, now 96. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >