Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 960)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Endlessly describing how Fogerty and the others —festered along— with recriminations, Bordowitz offers no perspective to keep the narrative momentum from slowing to a crawl in the long post-breakup half of the book. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
A doggedly researched but plodding, unambitious bio of the fondly remembered late '60s swamp-rock band. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"A thorough investigation of an age-old question, and though the historical record is not complete, Fields's persuasive interpretations and arguments may change some opinions about Richard and his nephews— fate. (16 paages color illustrations, not seen)"
A leading entertainment lawyer attempts to solve the historical mystery of what became of the two young princes who were kept in the Tower of London during the reign of King Richard III. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Neither engaging nor informative; in fact, forgettable."
Banal memoirs of woman who for the past 17 years has lived with Parkinson's disease, a chronic neurological condition that affects movement, speech, and sometimes mental functioning. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"The Burtons inhabit these pages, not as ghosts, but as presences. (photos, not seen)"
A refreshing historical narrative, from Beryl Markham biographer Lovell. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"The first Albright biography worth reading, but not destined to be the definitive account of a political career. (Author tour; radio satellite tour)"
A reasonably serious biography, by a reporter in Time magazine's Washington bureau. Read full book review >

THE FLIGHT OF JESSE LEROY BROWN by Theodore Taylor
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"While Brown's story is an important one, Taylor imbues it with the charm and cadences of a volume for young adults—hardly a fitting tribute to Brown, who was a subject of one of President Reagan's inspirational stories of the American dream. (photos, not seen)"
A mediocre, clichÇ-riddled tale of America's first black naval aviator, by the author of To Kill the Leopard (1993) and numerous other works. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Preston gracefully retells that stirring, unmistakably heroic, and sadly doomed adventure for a new generation."
An imaginative, sympathetic biography of the famous and ill-fated Antarctic explorer. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"A protracted and strange trip, but with much to glimpse along the way. (30 b&w photos, not seen)"
Like an acid trip, this social history of the Grateful Dead cum meditation on the '60s has both moments of startling, epiphanic clarity and meanderings both maundering and meaningful. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Drawing on a new-found trove of Doheny's personal correspondence, and well researched and narrated, this revisionist biography is an interesting addition to the social history of the times. (50 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
California historian Davis (Rivers in the Desert: William Mulholland and the Inventing of Los Angeles, 1993) revisits Teapot Dome, the cause cÇläbre that began in the time of Warren Harding, to tell the story of one of the scandal's prominent actors, now largely forgotten. Read full book review >
FALCON'S CRY by Michael Donnelly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"An honest, deeply felt look at the human cost of war. (photos, not seen)"
A moving memoir of the author's experiences as an air force pilot throughout the 1980s and the Persian Gulf War, that also confronts his seeming postwar diagnosis of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and his subsequent realization that he did not have ALS, but rather, "Gulf War syndrome.— While lacking the polish of an experienced writer, Donnelly makes up for this with an impressive degree of candor—discussing his reluctance, for example, to see a doctor although he fears that his flying skills have been impaired—and manages to convey his feelings of loyalty to the armed services, even in the wake of his discovery that those very same forces had experimented on him with medicines not yet approved by the FDA. Read full book review >
THINGS SEEN AND UNSEEN by Nora Gallagher
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"A beautifully rendered fusion of the transcendent and the day-to-day. (Author tour)"
A reflective, honest journey through the liturgical year with essayist Gallagher, whose writing has appeared in the New York Times, Mother Jones, and elsewhere. Read full book review >
A LIKELY STORY by Rosemary Mahoney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"In some ways, an unusually sharp magazine piece padded out to book length—but, nevertheless, a stylish memoir that recalls a legendary crusader caught with her armor down. (First serial to Vanity Fair and Elle)"
Bitter humor and painful honesty permeate this look back in anger 20 years to a summer spent by Mahoney (Whoredom in Kimmage: Irish Women Coming of Age, 1993, etc.) as domestic aide to Lillian Hellman, pictured here as conniving, hypocritical, abusive, and querulous in coping with age. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >