Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 973)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Written in language as robust as a monograph will allow, the book is a stunning achievement. (30 illustrations, not seen)"
A pathbreaking scholarly work, by one of the nation's leading historians of the interaction between Native Americans and European newcomers in early America. Read full book review >
DUNCAN GRANT by Frances Spalding
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"The only thing missing from these hundreds of exhaustively researched pages is Duncan Grant. (8 pages color, 16 pages b&w illustrations)"
A full-bodied but strangely affectless biography of the minor English painter and decorative artist. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"While Davis's insights aren't particularly new, his examination of Lincoln from the viewpoint of the average Union soldier confirms 'Old Abe's' undeniable genius as a wartime leader."
A worthwhile, though hardly groundbreaking study of the emotional bonds forged between the average Union soldier and "Father Abraham" Lincoln. Read full book review >
THE PRIVATE PASSIONS OF BONNIE PRINCE CHARLIE by Hugh Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A stirring story of a lost but heroic cause."
A full-dress revisiting of a romantic figure from Scottish history. Read full book review >
TED POSTON by Kathleen A. Hauke
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A gem of a book on a remarkable person—and his age. (24 b&w photos, not seen)"
Reading Ted Poston's life story is akin to reading several small chapters in American history. Read full book review >

DAUGHTER OF THE RIVER by Hong Ying
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A major writer emerges here, combining flawlessly the often broken dreams of youth and the usually broken dream of politics. (Author tour)"
A memoir of growing up amid poverty in contemporary urban China—at once lyrical and brutal. Read full book review >
REMEMBERED RAPTURE by bell hooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"And she does. (Author tour)"
A moving testimony to passion for the written word, and to the inherent difficulties of becoming a purveyor of both language and ideas. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Stock up on Godiva and Goo-Goo Bars and be entertained by this substantial report, without sugar coating, on a surefire topic. (photos, not seen)"
Former Washington Post reporter Brenner expands a simple assignment into an inviting visit to candy land, a place dominated by the legacies of two very different corporate dictators. Read full book review >
LITTLE SISTERS by Carolyn Lieberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Precious and contrived—enough to give little sisters a bad name."
Another simplistic pigeonhole useful for any junior siblings who want to blame someone else for their own problems: the disadvantageous fate of being a little sister. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A solid study of a black woman activist confronting both racial discrimination and controversial questions of gender role. (17 halftones, 11 linecuts)"
A black woman's rise from orphanhood to activism demonstrates social politcs in America during the Reconstruction era. Read full book review >
THE ORCHID THIEF by Susan Orlean
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"As for everyone else, there's little or no narrative drive to keep all the facts and mini-narratives flowing. (Author tour)"
Expanded from a New Yorker article, this long-winded if well-informed tale has less to do with John Laroche, the "thief," than it does with our author's desire to craft a comprehensive natural and social history of what the Victorians called "orchidelirium." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"But Latifah delivers her insights with a biographical frankness (dealing with her struggles with abusive relationships and questions of self-worth) and salty directness that her young female fans (for whom the book seems to be written) are likely to find engaging and convincing. (Author tour)"
The successful actress and rap singer offers a frank, down-to-earth, but somewhat unsurprising review of the hard life lessons she has learned, about self-respect, love, and independence. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >