Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 982)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Her Liuzzo is not a saint, but a courageous woman—restless, idealistic, stubborn, principled, and tragically ahead of her time. (23 illustrations, not seen)"
A loving tribute to civil rights martyr Viola Liuzzo adds a heartfelt, substantive, and long- neglected page to the movement's historical record. Read full book review >
SINGING LESSONS by Judy Collins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

This follow-up to Trust Your Heart (1987), the continuing autobiography of singer and songwriter Collins, is sometimes poignant but poorly constructed. Read full book review >

TO THE LIMIT by Marc Eliot
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"If you can take the pervasive atmosphere of cynical, calculating hedonism—that is, if you—re an Eagles fan—you couldn—t ask for a truer portrait. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A comprehensive, sternly opinionated chronicle of the band that embodied with fabulous commercial success the sensibility of Los Angeles in the 1970s. Read full book review >
THURGOOD MARSHALL by Juan Williams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Williams is uncritical of Marshall's personal flaws, but his reconstruction of Marshall makes for a lively and immensely valuable portrait of a first-rate legal mind and true American hero. (16 pages b&w photos not seen) (Author tour)"
Written with the cooperation of its subject, this is a solid, comprehensive biography that brings into focus a historical giant who has, sadly, faded from view. Read full book review >
A SEASON IN HELL by Marilyn French
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A rousing condemnation of medical ignorance and sexism, revealed in the story of a woman's struggle to live."
A graceful, uncompromising account of French's diagnosis of, treatment for, and survival of esophageal cancer. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"An unusual view of the human side of an extraordinary public figure. (Book-of-the-Month Club/History Book Club alternate selection; author tour)"
A warm, poignant picture of the relationship between Theodore Roosevelt and his six remarkable children, based on previously unpublished family letters, papers, and interviews. Read full book review >
WHY SINATRA MATTERS by Pete Hamill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Despite its brevity, Why Sinatra Matters belongs in any collection of important books on American popular music of the 20th Century."
What a perfect match: the world's greatest "saloon singer" eulogized superbly by the author of The Drinking Life (1993). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A bit more framework and background on Whitaker and some semblance of chronological clarity would have given this some lift, but sports buffs will enjoy the anecdotes."
A genial but poorly conceived series of recollections by sports announcer Whitaker, perhaps best remembered today for his coverage of professional golf. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Worth reading for the it's feisty message: 'It's your life, and it's up to you to save it.'"
A savvy Wall Street Journal editor expands a prize-winning Journal article on surviving cancer into a full-length gutsy account of how she dealt with both the illness and the bone-marrow transplant that saved her life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Quibbles aside, a useful overview of a momentous man and his music."
Metropolitan Opera fans will enjoy this up-close-and-personal look at one of the world's best conductors. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Minimal notes and (apparently) almost no editorial intervention make this a hard slog for all but the most ardent Beauvoirians."
Another volume of Beauvoir's correspondence to lay on the shelf beside Letters to Sartre (1991), this time featuring letters written to a most unlikely lover, the American novelist Nelson Algren. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Finally, McElheny's Land seems like a guest in his own biography, as ghostly and indistinct as the image on a negative. (b&w photos)"
The life of Edwin Land could easily spring from one of Horatio Alger's stories. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >