Biography & Memoir Book Reviews (page 985)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Yet it provides a close look at the inner workings of a government and a nation in transition, led by a woman of obvious bravery and good will. (Author tour)"
An anecdotal memoir by the present democratically elected leader of Nicaragua. Read full book review >
JAMES STEWART by Donald Dewey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A model of how to do a serious but entertaining Hollywood biography; Dewey never loses sight of the work, which is what makes Stewart important in the first place. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Biographer and novelist Dewey (Marcello Mastroianni, 1993; Reasonable Doubts, 1991) offers a voluminous, highly intelligent look at one of the richest and most complex of Hollywood star personas, not incidentally, one of the industry's most beloved actors. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Exuberant and compulsively readable, Hendrickson's work easily stands with the very best literary nonfiction on the Vietnam war. (8 photos, not seen) (First printing of 100,000; first serial to the Washington Post; author tour)"
Forget Robert McNamara's much-ballyhooed but deeply disappointing pseudo mea culpa, In Retrospect. Read full book review >
SOJOURNER TRUTH by Nell Irvin Painter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"No one seriously interested in Sojourner Truth can afford to ignore this book."
A successful effort to separate a human being from the familiar "Strong Black Woman'' symbol she has become. Read full book review >
PAUL RICOEUR by Charles E. Reagan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A thin book on a dense philosopher, wavering between sycophantic tones and ponderous discourse."
Though Ricoeur can arguably take some credit for making ``hermeneutics'' a buzzword in graduate seminars, Reagan's passably informative, slightly schizoid book isn't likely to increase awareness of the eminent philosopher. Read full book review >

THE LETTERS OF VINCENT VAN GOGH by Vincent van Gogh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"These letters reveal the extraordinary personal struggle that lay behind his triumphant ability to do so. (49 pen-and-ink sketches)"
A new translation of van Gogh's ebullient letters (including some never before published), edited by the director of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, revealing the painter to be an intensely observant and passionate man, struggling to understand and overcome the episodes of mental illness that so damaged his life. Read full book review >
BLUE SKY DREAM by David Beers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

Beers's ``communal memoir'' chronicles not just a family, but an era, an industry and a demographic segment that once represented the best—or worst—America offered, depending on your point of view. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A provocative analysis of success and failure in the nation's most difficult job. (Author tour)"
Dallek (History/UCLA; Lone Star Rising, 1991; Ronald Reagan: The Politics of Symbolism, 1984; etc.) thoughtfully finds some common denominators of effective presidential performance. Read full book review >
SWIMMING THE CHANNEL by Sally Friedman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Not much comfort here, but a distinctive portrait of survival."
An unsentimental but ardent record of love and grief, related by a woman who lost her husband only days before she was to swim the English Channel. Read full book review >
LAST GANG IN TOWN by Marcus Gray
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gray's smug, repetitive prose utterly fails to put the Clash in a coherent context the way Jon Savage's towering England's Dreaming did for the Sex Pistols. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A hopelessly rambling and combative biography of the seminal punk band. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"American campuses."
A case of life imitating stereotype, with Meisner (History/Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison) expressing the hope that socialism in China may be rescued by a revolution against the Communist regime. Read full book review >
THE FACT OF BLACKNESS by Alan Read
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Then, at least, it might have something to say. (20 b&w photos)"
This exploration of Frantz Fanon's continuing impact on the visual arts is a woefully maladroit collection of third-rate essays and dialogues. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 3, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >