ROBINSON CRUSOE: USN by Blake Clark

ROBINSON CRUSOE: USN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Probably the discovery of a sole survivor of the American forces on Guam has had more publicity than any other survivor story so far recorded. Blake Clark has told -- in the first person -- George Tweed's story, a story of two and a half years eluding the Japs, who took Guam on December 10th, 1941. Tweed was Radio Man First Class, USN. He and another Navy man, Al Tyson, escaped when the Japs arrived -- took to the bush -- and, with the help of loyal natives of the island, managed for a time to escape detection. Then they separated, and eventually Tyson was betrayed. Tweed rigged up a radio and for a time issued an underground paper, but the very popularity of his paper betrayed him, and he moved again and again, often escaping just a moment ahead of the enemy. Fascinating in the ingenuity of his manufacturing homemade ""comforts"" out of very little; an encouraging picture of the loyalty and courage of the natives who gave unstintedly from meagre stores, and who betrayed him out of sheer friendliness and wanting to share him with their friends. But one wishes there were more feel of Tweed emotional links with the world -- less a sense of adventure in a vacuum.

Pub Date: April 9th, 1945
Publisher: Whittlesey House