COUSY ON THE CELTIC MYSTIQUE by Bob & Bob Ryan Cousy

COUSY ON THE CELTIC MYSTIQUE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A walk down Memory Lane for die-hard Celtic fans; from one of their all-time great players, Cousy--now a TV commentator--and helpmate Ryan, basketball writer for the Boston Globe. The Boston Celtics--except that they win--are the Chicago Cubs of pro basketball, inspiring a dedication that cuts across locale. And one of the reasons through the years that they became so was the aggressive play of Bob Cousy, Bill Russell, the Jones boys, and the coaching of cigar-puffing Red Auerbach. Thus, getting a book from Cousy on the ""Celtic Mystique"" is comparable to discovering a cheering song recorded on His Master's Voice by Tinkers, Evers, and Chance. Cousy sets his sights on the high road of determining just whether or not such a mystique exists and just what makes the Celtics so special. But, in reality, this is just a handy excuse for a snip-and-glue nostalgia session that focuses on such issues as Bill Russell's off-court obstinacy in refusing to sign autographs, even to the point of embarrassment at state dinners. Other examples of the slapdash nature of the book are chapters comparing Bill Russell to Wilt Chamberlain (""Wilt was such an individualistic player that, rather than help his teammates, he would often generate petty jealousies; Russell had much more intimacy""); ""College Basketball and Bob Knight""; and a couple that are excuses for some good Red Auerbach anecdotes. In the end, almost all that Cousy can say about the Celtic Mystique is that, to him, ""it's a pain in the ass."" The ""Green People""--the hordes of devoted Celtic groupies that follow them everywhere--drive Celtic executives crazy. Despite a promising premise, then, here Cousy and Ryan have offered up a stone that was better left unturned.

Pub Date: Dec. 26th, 1988
Publisher: McGraw-Hill