SO LONG AT THE FAIR by Bonner McMillion

SO LONG AT THE FAIR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A relaxed, entertaining turn-of-the-century narrative as seen through the eyes of young Lanis- orphaned at birth, who prefers to dog the footsteps of his adored older brother Johnny rather than accept the ""poor lamb"" image offered by well-meaning relatives. This course offers a variety of experience as enterprising, ambitious Johnny, thwarted at a baseball career, is cajoled into joining a touring theatrical company by their equally engaging fourth cousin Julia. Signed up as man and wife (for her protection), Johnny finds it difficult to enter into the spirit of the new life with Lanis ever-present, ever innocent. Julia finally finds Jonny's misgivings about life-upon-the-wicked-stage sadly true and is sent home by her vindicated ""husband"" to await his arrival (after he has made his mark) and their subsequent marriage. Jonny and Lanis hie to Dallas and after a year of trying ventures and adventures, Johnny finds himself making money in insurance. The homecoming triumph in a new Hip-mobile is married by Julia's unexpected disdain (Johnny hadn't written). Initiative and unwitting relatives bring ""the family"" together again. Solid characterizations, excellent dialect, realistic regional flavor.

Publisher: Doubleday