THE LAST DAYS OF SEVASTOPOL by Boris Voyetkhov
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THE LAST DAYS OF SEVASTOPOL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Perfect blend of sound track and word pictures, is this graphic record of a siege that will go down in history. Voyetkhov, Russian correspondent of Moscow's Pravda, battled his way through military and naval and civilian red tape to get into Sevastopol during the final days of its heroic stand. His story starts at a Black Sea port -- ends eleven days after the official date of the abandonment of the doomed city, a shell of a city, a ghost city. He makes one see and hear and small the siege and the beleaguered. I've never read a more penetrating record -- it is another bit of evidence that for Russia at least this is wholly a people's war. Men, women, children, officers soldiers, civilians and their commissars -- everyone was part of it. The text is an account of super-human endurance, of flaming faith, of rarely questioned courage, -- heroes all and not enough decorations to go round. It should open the eyes of those who still think of the Russians an masse as canon fodder with a passive stubbornness which stalls the Nazi machine. Here you see them as an aggressive, fearless, determined people who admit no chance of any outcome but victory. There is little of any political flavor; it is Russia, it is the Crimea, it is Sevastopol, it is home for which they fight and die. Told through vivid pen portraits, , etc.

Pub Date: May 17th, 1943
Publisher: Knopf