THE TRIUMPHS OF O'ROURKE by Brian Cleeve

THE TRIUMPHS OF O'ROURKE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

For those unfortunate enough to get stuck with what is no doubt the most conventionally written novel of the last decade, let it be known, as Francis O'Rourke discovers when trying to erect O'Rourke (eventually Gandon) House, a million dollar architect's dream in the center of Dublin, that success isn't everything. The range of character types (from priest to Commie to aristocratic social-climbers to neo-Fascist members of the Guardians of the Flame) conveniently appear on John Lennox's ""Friday at Ten"" talk show, neatly summarizing the conflict between Preservers and Destroyers and paving the way for the practically book-length flashback (the lazy author's cop-out) which shows that au fond (in case anyone didn't know) nobody is as good or bad as they seem to be, except maybe the now-politicized Lennox, Labour's dream in the battle against the occasionally evil but more often unknowing fat cats of the Party of Reality. O'Rourke's rag-to-semi-unhappy-riches may provide superficial interest for those who have not read this book too many times before; for the rest, it will reassure those endless Irish expatriates that they have done well to stay away.

Pub Date: Feb. 25th, 1971
Publisher: Doubleday