A subject and telling too simple for teenagers, but younger readers will be enchanted.

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BLUE SKY

A fairy tale–like story about growing up and claiming one’s place in the wide, mysterious world.

Old Stone, a wise past leader of his ibex clan, is watching the mountains one day when he spots a strong young alpinist scaling the rock face. The worlds of ibex and human have been separate for as long as anyone can remember, yet Old Stone is drawn to this particular human. Although he ascends higher than any other human Old Stone has seen, the alpinist eventually falls, causing Old Stone to rush to his side. As the ibex reaches the man, however, he finds a human baby, who is now, it would seem, an orphan. To the chagrin of the herd’s alpha males, Old Stone and his friend Nan raise the child, whom they name Blue Sky for the color of her eyes. While Blue Sky’s childhood is for the most part as carefree as any other young ibex’s, her existence eventually forces Old Stone and Nan to retreat from the herd each winter—seasonal banishment for their adopting a human child. As she grows, Blue Sky begins to question her origins and her purpose: is she meant to live her entire life as an ibex? Why, when she spies the occasional human on the mountain, does she feel such a longing to join this other, somewhat alien species? Who were her mother and father, and why can she understand the language of dreams? The answers become even more evasive when Blue Sky rescues a boy, Gaston, from the icy peak and begins to learn more about the world beyond the mountains. Author Kindall has crafted a dreamy story that will appeal to young readers because the narrative’s straightforward language and simplicity are easy to navigate. Parents may also find that the subject—finding the courage to strike out on your own and discover your life’s path—is fitting for children just beginning to understand the world of adults.

A subject and telling too simple for teenagers, but younger readers will be enchanted.

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-9909328-1-9

Page Count: 292

Publisher: Diving Boy Books

Review Posted Online: May 18, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2015

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The book is perfect for read-alouds, with occasional, often onomatopoeic Spanish words such as “quiquiriquí,” “tacatac” and...

WAITING FOR THE BIBLIOBURRO

Inspired by Colombian librarian Luis Soriano Bohórquez, Brown’s latest tells of a little girl whose wish comes true when a librarian and two book-laden burros visit her remote village.

Ana loves to read and spends all of her free time either reading alone or to her younger brother. She knows every word of the one book she owns. Although she uses her imagination to create fantastical bedtime tales for her brother, she really wants new books to read. Everything changes when a traveling librarian and his two donkeys, Alfa and Beto, arrive in the village. Besides loaning books to the children until his next visit, the unnamed man also reads them stories and teaches the younger children the alphabet. When Ana suggests that someone write a book about the traveling library, he encourages her to complete this task herself. After she reads her library books, Ana writes her own story for the librarian and gives it to him upon his reappearance—and he makes it part of his biblioburro collection. Parra’s colorful folk-style illustrations of acrylics on board bring Ana’s real and imaginary worlds to life. This is a child-centered complement to Jeanette Winter’s Biblioburro (2010), which focuses on Soriano.

The book is perfect for read-alouds, with occasional, often onomatopoeic Spanish words such as “quiquiriquí,” “tacatac” and “iii-aah” adding to the fun.   (author’s note, glossary of Spanish terms) (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: July 12, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-58246-353-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tricycle

Review Posted Online: June 6, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2011

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With comically realistic black-and-white illustrations by Selznick (The Robot King, 1995, etc.), this is a captivating...

FRINDLE

Nicholas is a bright boy who likes to make trouble at school, creatively. 

When he decides to torment his fifth-grade English teacher, Mrs. Granger (who is just as smart as he is), by getting everyone in the class to replace the word "pen'' with "frindle,'' he unleashes a series of events that rapidly spins out of control. If there's any justice in the world, Clements (Temple Cat, 1995, etc.) may have something of a classic on his hands. By turns amusing and adroit, this first novel is also utterly satisfying. The chess-like sparring between the gifted Nicholas and his crafty teacher is enthralling, while Mrs. Granger is that rarest of the breed: a teacher the children fear and complain about for the school year, and love and respect forever after. 

With comically realistic black-and-white illustrations by Selznick (The Robot King, 1995, etc.), this is a captivating tale—one to press upon children, and one they'll be passing among themselves. (Fiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-689-80669-8

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1996

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