THE CASE AGAINST COLONEL SUTTON by Bruce Cameron

THE CASE AGAINST COLONEL SUTTON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Lieutenant Colonel David Sutton is apprehended in Paris by Army Intelligence, his elopement with a General's daughter interrupted, to undergo an investigation stemming from the charge that he is a homosexual. Actually until the investigation is completed no specific charge can be made against Sutton; he is not on trial, but neither can be confront his accusers nor have access to the testimony against him. It happens that Sutton is a strikingly handsome man -- too good looking, it is thought, for a soldier, and more damaging still, from some points of view, he paints. For the most part the book consists of the conflict between Sutton and the Army's investigator, Adams, whose own personal difficulties prejudice his viewpoint against the Colonel and make it imperative that he absolve his own guilt by condemning Sutton. Ultimately Adams' spurious charges are exposed in their maliciousness and so is his own neurotic life but before that eventuality Sutton has become convinced of the impossibility of continuing in a career that will be forever blemished regardless of the outcome of the investigation. He resigns, to devote himself to painting and to Adams' secretary, one of the few who stood by him. As it develops here, the dramatic exchanges are intelligent and deftly handled but the overall situation is a little too pat to be credible.

Publisher: Coward-McCann