THE WRONG MAN IN UNIFORM by Bruce K. Chapman

THE WRONG MAN IN UNIFORM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When the President's commission on the selective service system makes its report in January, 1967, presumably with few sweeping suggestions for improvement, Congress will have an opportunity to open debate on the Universal Military Training Act. Mr. Chapman, along with Representative Thomas B. Curtis (R-Missouri), who wrote the introduction to this volume, and an indeterminate number of other Congressmen, is hoping then to see the present draft law not merely corrected, but abolished. Mr. Chapman, formerly an editorial writer for the New York Herald Tribune, is no pacifist. His argument is that ""our unfair and unneeded draft"" is outmoded, as well as a cruel hoax, rife with inequities and invitations to cynicism and evasion. His answer to it is a completely volunteer, professional military. This is hardly a new proposal; indeed, heated debate about it predates the Constitution. What is new is the formidable array of statistics and the lucid presentation of all the alternatives. The publisher expresses the wishful opinion that Bruce Chapman may do for the draft what Ralph Nader did for auto safety. He has big guns ranged against him, however, the most recent barrage coming from Hanson Baldwin -- ""The Draft is Here to Stay, New York Times Magazine, November 20.

Publisher: Trident