THE LAST DAYS OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE by Bruce Powe

THE LAST DAYS OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A rather weak member of the futuristic sci-fi genre with a prologue culled from Marquez that does nothing to legitimize a narrative we have read bits and pieces of a hundred times before. It's the African hordes sailing in rusty tugboats across the sea to underpopulated twenty-first century America (actually, the Eastern Union thereof) -- which has been benignly ruling the world under laws of Concentric Harmony discovered by an unwitting music historian in search of a missing guitar string. The ruling Peace Corps attacks the African with loads of breads, and when they're finally forced to use a nuke, it's a dud. Meanwhile scrawny Professor Harry Kornwire (fat is a sign of status) and his current wife Angola become pals with Major Kwesi Ofuru, chronicler of the great invasion, all of whom are repelled rather equally by the rapine of the blacks and the automaton killer insects of the whites. As is usual in this kind of exercise from ""Sleeper"" on up, most of the humor derives from falsified future interpretations of current pop cultures -- jokes on such tired talismans as Tricky Dick, Bob Dylan, and the great god Bobby Hull. Deja, jamais, and presque vu in one swell foop.

Pub Date: Aug. 29th, 1974
Publisher: St. Martin's Press