THE BATTLE OF THE TORPEDO BOATS by Bryan Cooper

THE BATTLE OF THE TORPEDO BOATS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Presumably there are some readers who have been waiting for just such a documentary account of motor torpedo boats in every major conflict of every theatre of operations in World War II. Mr. Cooper has written a supererogatory chronicle covering both Allied and Axis forces, from the North Sea to the English Channel, the Mediterranean to the Adriatic to the Pacific. His dense record seems to omit not one name, rank, craft rating or classification, nor the medals, commendations and promotions accrued by the combatants. A technical chapter reviews the design history of the motor torpedo boat (greatly refined in the U.S. by ""rum-trade"" smugglers during Prohibition), and interspersed throughout are the different uses of this craft in coastal waters: blockades, mine-laying, torpedo-running off east and south coasts of Britain; rescue operations and feint landings and hand-to-hand combat in the Mediterranean; amphibious landings, harbor raids, barge-hunting and enemy harassment in the Pacific. This last was especially effective since the Japanese, unlike the Germans and the Italians, had no opposite number to the American PT's or the British MTB's. Notwithstanding the well-known JFK adventure or MacArthur's PT escape from Corregidor, the small significant dramas drown in the spume of acronyms.

Pub Date: May 27th, 1970
Publisher: Stein & Day