GEORGE WASHINGTON AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION by Burke Davis

GEORGE WASHINGTON AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A standard narrative of Washington's command years, less reflective and psychologically acute than several of its bicentennial competitors. True, the stolid and secretive Washington is a hard nut; Davis shows him as providing stability and fortitude for his more brilliant but erratic subordinates. The book gives a sense of the half-hearted way the British prosecuted the war, and of its military highlights, especially the Yorktown victory over Cornwallis. However, it tends to assume a jejune style, with its solemnly presented anecdotes: a young soldier asks Washington to share his wine jug, Washington says ""By God, boy, this is no time to drink!"" but wheels back and condescends, whereupon the soldier says he will shed his ""last drop of heart's blood"" for Washington, who ""rides off into the fog."" It would be unfair to hold it against Davis that he has already written reams of biographies, histories, novels and children's books centering around the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. But this is a negligible contribution.

Pub Date: Nov. 17th, 1975
Publisher: Random House