THE PRACTICAL ECONOMIST by Burton Crane

THE PRACTICAL ECONOMIST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an expansion and revision of Getting and Spending (1956) and again offers the inquiring layman a lively and probing answer. The basic elements of today's economics are analyzed, against historical backgrounds, and he explores the importance of a planned economy, to a greater extent. With subtlety, no little humor, thorough understanding, and a real sense of drama, Mr. Crane, The New York Times financial columnist, does a significant job in keeping his readers abreast of main channels of economic thought, while supplying them with enough of the pros and cons to draw their own conclusions. He acknowledges himself less easy going on debt and unbalanced budgets, more insistent on flexible and specialized controls, more certain of the dangers in full employment and increasing efficiency outpacing distribution and absorption, more insistent on the necessity of lowered protections, more international exchanges, encouraging imports in areas now given subsidies, and facing our responsibilities in the underdeveloped world. Some of his conclusions are interesting compared with Scott (see report below). Rewarding.

Pub Date: Jan. 27th, 1959
Publisher: Simon & Schuster