WASHINGTON'S FAREWELL ADDRESS: The View from the 20th Century by Burton Ira.--Ed. Kaufman

WASHINGTON'S FAREWELL ADDRESS: The View from the 20th Century

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Today no one seems to know exactly what Washington meant in his Farewell Address (1796) when he said of American foreign relations: ""It is our true policy to steer clear of any permanent alliance with any portion of the foreign world, . . . neither seeking nor granting exclusive favors."" One thing, however, is certain: the Address contains no warning against the entangling alliances so long quoted by isolationists; the phrase, invented by Thomas Jefferson, was added to the Address after Washington's death in 1797. Edited by an American historian, this present book offers an intepretation of Washington's words as seen by eight 20th-century authorities on American foreign policy; it also contains a transcript of the Address, accounts of its historical beginnings, and notes and comments by the editor.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1969
Publisher: Quadrangle