Business & Economics Book Reviews

GLASS HOUSE by Brian Alexander
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A devastating and illuminating book that shows how a city and a country got where they are and how difficult it can be to reverse course."
A journalist examines how corporate America and the politics enabling it have corroded an Ohio city to its very foundation. Read full book review >
HOW MAY I HELP YOU? by Deepak Singh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An interesting look at a puzzling society—ours—from the point of view of a sympathetic but not uncritical outsider. Good reading for students of comparative cultures."
An immigrant's thoughtful account of what it means to make a new life in a strange land, in this case the South. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A quick and instructive read for readers with a casual interest in this quickly changing company as well as those fascinated by the fates of startups."
A fast-moving, well-researched account of the founding and surprising growth of home-sharing company Airbnb. Read full book review >
STRETCH by Scott Sonenshein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A convincing argument within a compelling narrative—recommended for business managers and resourceful individuals alike."
A social scientist examines inventive ways that individuals and organizations can build on their existing resources to achieve remarkable results. Read full book review >
HIT MAKERS by Derek Thompson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Good reading for anyone who aspires to understand the machinery of pop culture—and perhaps even craft a hit of his or her own."
How does a nice idea become an earworm, or a fashion trend, or—shudder—a meme? Atlantic senior editor Thompson ventures a few well-considered answers. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"It's a story that requires lots of insider information of its own kind to write, and Kolhatkar handles the job well though without the narrative flair of Michael Lewis' kindred book Flash Boys."
A formulaic but still intriguing financial cops-and-robbers story. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"Easily digested research and personal stories in support of breast-feeding and its importance to mothers and their children."
Why breast-feeding is often frowned upon in the United States despite the well-documented health benefits for both mother and child. Read full book review >
FRAUD by Edward J. Balleisen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A touch arid at times, but overall a fascinating, illuminating look at bunko and the social conditions under which its practitioners operate—and flourish."
A broad-ranging study of the big swindle in American life over the last couple of centuries. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"Despite patches of gee-whiz formulaic prose ('the Airbnb marketplace had the most incredible structural momentum that many of the company's investors and executives had ever seen'), Stone's account is illuminating reading for the business-minded."
Celebratory biography of the upstart companies that regulators love to hate. Read full book review >
REFINERY TOWN by Steve Early
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"A specific tale of governance at the local level that should appeal to labor activists and scholars of urban studies."
In Richmond, California, overlooking scenic San Francisco Bay, is a company town bankrolled by Chevron. A resident reports, in some detail, on his town's fraught governance. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Valuable reading for shoppers and retailers alike."
Blame it on the smartphone, the technology that is bringing internetlike tracking and surveillance into brick-and-mortar stores. Read full book review >
CULTURE AS WEAPON by Nato Thompson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"A precisely written critique of cultural manipulation in our daily lives."
How persuasive cultural mechanisms are encoded in broader social structures, from high art to war-planning. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >