Business & Economics Book Reviews

WELCOME TO THE POISONED CHALICE by James K. Galbraith
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"A book best read by policy wonks of a numerate bent but accessible to noneconomists as well."
A series of essays, letters, and other documents examining the latest Greek tragedy. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"Indian casinos are likely to be around for a long time to come, and Mitchell's exposé goes a long way toward explaining the whys and hows."
That casino on the nearby reservation? Think of it as revenge for Christopher Columbus, as some wags have put it—but also a sophisticated operation that makes use of every legal loophole available. Read full book review >

THE GREAT INVENTION by Ehsan Masood
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 15, 2016

"A welcome cross-examination of a concept that seems as natural as sunlight but that, like every other human construct, is shot through with both politics and flaws."
We all know that statistics can lie. But what about one of the greatest statistical measures of all, Gross Domestic Product? Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 14, 2016

"Stern's T-shirt slogan puts it well: 'It's really not that complicated.' Pipe dream it may be, but this is a book eminently worth talking about."
Want pie in the sky? How about convincing Americans to accept the "almost un-American" premise of a guaranteed income for all? Read full book review >
The Kingmaker by Tony Bridwell
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 14, 2016

"An entertaining saga about 'the power of second chances,' and resetting life and management priorities."
With his top clients involved in crises, a PR "kingmaker" realizes that he has lost sight of true leadership and purpose in this business/self-help fable. Read full book review >

ECCENTRIC ORBITS by John Bloom
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A tour de force history of a star-crossed technological leap."
A spellbinding history of a massively impressive work of technology. Read full book review >
BRILLIANCE AND FIRE by Rachelle Bergstein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Bergstein's book is an informative, well-written, and entertaining window onto another way of life."
Bergstein (Women from the Ankle Down: The Story of Shoes and How They Define Us, 2012) provides a history of diamond mining and marketing that reveals the deadly world behind this magical stone.Read full book review >
THE PRICE OF PROSPERITY by Todd G. Buchholz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A refreshing book that offers an alternative to the failing shibboleths of the day."
How to renew the greatness of rich but potentially failing nations, like the United States. Read full book review >
THE RISE AND FALL OF NATIONS by Ruchir Sharma
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Evenhanded, measured, sage advice on the global economy."
This efficient, positive guide for the practical observer and investor shows how to choose healthy emerging markets. Read full book review >
THE INNER LIVES OF MARKETS by Ray Fisman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoughtful examination of the mechanics of our one-click world."
How economic theories power our market-driven lives. Read full book review >
THE INEVITABLE by Kevin Kelly
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Kelly's arguments ring true, and his enthusiasm is contagious. Readers will enjoy the ride provided they forget that he has disobeyed his warning against assuming that today's trends will continue."
That futurists have a terrible record hasn't discouraged them, and this delightful addition to the genre does not deny that predictions have been wildly off-base. Read full book review >
FRACKOPOLY by Wenonah Hauter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"There is no question where Hauter's sympathies lie, and her grim litany of greed, corruption, and environmental damage may stir activists to action but deeply discourage general readers."
An angry polemic on fracking and the importance of "leaving fossil fuels in the ground and reorienting the production and use of electricity." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >