Business & Economics Book Reviews

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Solid reporting combined with engaging stories—even about campaign finance reform."
A blistering account of concerted Republican efforts to quiet the political voices of minorities, students, and the poor. Read full book review >
FAIL U. by Charles J. Sykes
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Though Sykes' Limbaugh-esque project scores some good points along the way, his shrill denunciations don't get at the core of the real problem or at a solution."
Ah, college, a time for beer blasts, casual sex, and, ahem, "bizarre cultural intolerances." Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Insightful, encouraging, and universally practical."
A New York Times business reporter shares her wisdom on creating and completing that elusive back-burner dream project. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Amid the author's personal journey reside priceless cultural and professional insights."
The experiences of an American couple in South Korea underscore how little the West really knows about the country. Read full book review >
CALIFORNIA COMEBACK by Narda Zacchino
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Although income inequality, overcrowded prisons, drought, and traffic continue to challenge California, Zacchino persuasively portrays the state as vibrant, farsighted, and civic minded."
An informative history of troubles and triumphs in the Golden State. Read full book review >

CAPITAL OFFENSES by Samuel Buell
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A book that will challenge conventional wisdom among readers who intuitively believe that corporations often game the system."
The federal prosecutor for the massive Enron investigation examines why corporations and their executives rarely face criminal charges, no matter how widespread their hurtful conduct. Read full book review >
THE EURO by Joseph E. Stiglitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A cogent and urgent argument of compelling interest to economists and policymakers."
A tale of monetary union and its discontents. Read full book review >
MY FIRST LIFE by Hugo Chávez
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"Monster or savior? Norteamericano leaders accustomed to the view of Chávez as evil incarnate may value this alternate, assuredly self-serving presentation of facts and events."
The late Venezuelan leader—or strongman, or dictator, if you like—tells all. Read full book review >
NECESSARY TROUBLE by Sarah Jaffe
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"An essential guide to forces shaping our nation and the 2016 presidential election."
Journalist and Nation Institute fellow Jaffe debuts with an in-depth account of the wave of populist anger driving "a new era of protest and activism" in the United States. Read full book review >
THE CURSE OF CASH by Kenneth S. Rogoff
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Money geeks are the primary audience, to be sure, but futurists and trend-watchers will also take interest in the author's proposals for phasing out cash."
A noted economist imagines a modern society that functions without paper money and coins. Read full book review >
WEAPONS OF MATH DESTRUCTION by Cathy O'Neil
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An unusually lucid and readable look at the daunting algorithms that govern so many aspects of our lives."
How ill-conceived algorithms now micromanage America's economy, from advertising to prisons. Read full book review >
THE TETRIS EFFECT by Dan Ackerman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An all-inclusive history behind one of the most popular video games ever."
How a simple computer game of cascading geometric shapes became a worldwide phenomenon. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >