Business & Economics Book Reviews

SHOE DOG by Phil Knight
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"By the numbers, to be sure, but students of business, for whom Nike is a well-established case study, may want to have this view straight from the source."
Nike mogul Knight charts the rise of his business empire, a world leader in athletic wear. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 14, 2016

"Stern's T-shirt slogan puts it well: 'It's really not that complicated.' Pipe dream it may be, but this is a book eminently worth talking about."
Want pie in the sky? How about convincing Americans to accept the "almost un-American" premise of a guaranteed income for all? Read full book review >

BLUFF by Anjum Hoda
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 12, 2016

"Sound post-Keynesian economic reasoning well argued—a book that one hopes, against the odds, the heads of the Federal Reserve and the Bank of England will entertain."
A financial cri de coeur from a banking insider. Read full book review >
BRAZILLIONAIRES by Alex Cuadros
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 12, 2016

"Well-rounded and -researched portraits of the staggering chasm between rich and poor in Brazil."
On the trail of enormous wealth in Brazil—an engine of national progress or a trench of impoverishment? Read full book review >
CAPITAL OFFENSES by Samuel Buell
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A book that will challenge conventional wisdom among readers who intuitively believe that corporations often game the system."
The federal prosecutor for the massive Enron investigation examines why corporations and their executives rarely face criminal charges, no matter how widespread their hurtful conduct. Read full book review >

THE GREAT INVENTION by Ehsan Masood
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 15, 2016

"A welcome cross-examination of a concept that seems as natural as sunlight but that, like every other human construct, is shot through with both politics and flaws."
We all know that statistics can lie. But what about one of the greatest statistical measures of all, Gross Domestic Product? Read full book review >
FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY by Sam Polk
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 19, 2016

"A heartfelt and cautionary success story incorporating both the deceptive promises of wealth and the life-changing power of self-awareness."
A former Wall Street hedge fund trader's transformative turnabout from greed to philanthropy. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Not the how-to book that its title suggests but Fish presents a compelling argument about the necessity of argument."
The acclaimed literary theorist and law professor addresses the concept of argument. Read full book review >
THE INEVITABLE by Kevin Kelly
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Kelly's arguments ring true, and his enthusiasm is contagious. Readers will enjoy the ride provided they forget that he has disobeyed his warning against assuming that today's trends will continue."
That futurists have a terrible record hasn't discouraged them, and this delightful addition to the genre does not deny that predictions have been wildly off-base. Read full book review >
FRACKOPOLY by Wenonah Hauter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"There is no question where Hauter's sympathies lie, and her grim litany of greed, corruption, and environmental damage may stir activists to action but deeply discourage general readers."
An angry polemic on fracking and the importance of "leaving fossil fuels in the ground and reorienting the production and use of electricity." Read full book review >
The Casual Mentor by Hank Hoppin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 14, 2015

"A worthy book about building closer relationships between management and frontline staff through casual mentoring."
Hoppin argues that informal mentoring programs are far more effective than organized, human resources-mandated workplace systems. Read full book review >
Corporate Prisoner by J. Paul Kingston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"Dramatic testimony and useful guidance about the art and anguish of career management."
A former bank vice president shares his corporate travails, his transition to self-employment, and general business advice in this debut memoir and self-help guide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >