Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 168)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 5, 1994

"Capital analyses of how money makes the world go around, plus an agenda for restructuring an ad hoc order that's been overtaken by events."
Shelton, whose 1989 audit of Kremlin finances (The Coming Soviet Crash) proved dead-on, here casts a cold eye on the increasingly fractious and risky state of the international monetary system. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 2, 1994

"The goal, presumably, is to enable legions of suited workers to imagine that they're really armored Lancelots, that their workstations are noble mounts, and that the business of making a living—or a widget, or an arrow—is just as heroic as the deeds of Arthurian legend."
Byham and Cox (Zapp!, not reviewed) tell a facile fable about dragon-slaying in order to spread yet another business gospel about quality, teamwork, and empowerment. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1994

"A notable achievement."
From a British specialist in Asian affairs, this is comprehensive, fact-choked history of the Engish East India Company, which went to India to trade and founded an empire—the British Raj. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"She does this entertainingly and with a minimum of dry analysis."
Levathes, a former staff writer for National Geographic, tells the tale of Chinese emperor Zhu Di and his favorite eunuch admiral, Zheng He, who tried during a 30-year period to break China's isolation with seven major naval expeditions to India, Indonesia, and Africa. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1994

"The bottom line: a linear take on an oldish rogues-to-riches tale, conspicuously deficient in the resonance that could have made it worth retelling."
A lackluster retelling of a celebrated stock-rigging case and its aftershocks, which rippled through Los Angeles for the better (or worse) part of a decade, from the author of Baseball's Great Experiment (1983). Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 27, 1994

"Light and lively fare—containing just enough facts to satisfy."
A bright, breezy, and opinionated look at how the Food and Drug Administration has handled and mishandled its job in the past decade. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 17, 1994

"A detailed and enlightening introduction to a socioeconomic construct that is a vital determinant of the wealth of nations."
Charkham, a former Bank of England aide and member of the United Kingdom's Cadbury Committee (which produced a 1992 report on the financial aspects of corporate governance), offers an informative (if occasionally donnish) primer on how private enterprises are managed in France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, and the US. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 15, 1994

"The jargon-marred text has tabular material throughout."
If D'Aveni were not a professor at Dartmouth's Amos Tuck School, one could easily imagine that his grandiloquent management guide was meant to be an absurdist spoof of a publishing subgenre not especially teeming with useful or readable works. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 15, 1994

"An informed and informative guide to the US economy's strengths and weaknesses for those perplexed or offended by the major media's invariably shallow, frequently mistaken interpretations."
Best known for maverick views on federal deficits and the national debt, Eisner (Economics/Northwestern Unviersity; How Real is the Federal Deficit?, not reviewed) makes his signature subjects a centerpiece of this contrarian and somewhat unfashionable audit of the domestic economy. Read full book review >
HARD TO SWALLOW by Richard W. Lacey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1994

"British by birth but quite adaptable to American readers."
Charming, delightful, often richly depressing survey about what we eat, by Lacey (Medical Microbiology/Leeds;Unsafe for Human Consumption—not reviewed). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Serious anthropology but also much like a long night out, expenses paid."
An assistant professor in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University, Allison worked as a hostess in a Tokyo club, where she examined how the rituals of a hostess define gender identities in Japan. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1994

"A savvy reckoning of the cost of the zero-sum games the American people play."
A we-have-met-the-enemy-and-he-is-us tract that, for all its evenhanded approach to an obvious dilemma, appears as likely to attract bipartisan opprobrium as to spark a debate on the overburdened state of the union. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >