Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 168)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 1994

"The bottom line: anecdotal happy talk that promises far more in the way of socioeconomic rewards than its New Age precepts can plausibly deliver."
Still in search of instructive excellence, consultant Waterman (The Renewal Factor, etc.) offers a relentlessly upbeat briefing on what he views as the managerial lessons to be learned from presumptively paradigmatic US enterprises. Read full book review >
MANAGING CORPORATE ETHICS by Francis J. Aguilar
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1994

"In brief, then, a series of object lessons documenting in no great depth how presumptively model concerns deal with the ethical challenges that are a workaday consequence of being in business."
A can't-hurt handbook for executives that promises (pleasingly if unpersuasively) that ethical conduct can enhance the performance of an already well-run enterprise. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1994

"No wonder a Pulitzer graces Nalder's mantle. (First printing of 15,000)"
Fresh on the heels of a Pulitzer for his reporting on the oil shipping business, Nalder (Seattle Times) offers this flowing, believe-it-or-not account of life on an oil tanker. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1994

"You've heard all this New Age-speak before, but the individual stories—most of them lively and fresh—save Schultz's rendering from being trite."
Mixing Jungian psychology and New Age physics with the homespun philosophies of successful entrepreneurs, business-writer Schultz (coauthor: Cashing Out, 1991—not reviewed) concludes that if you want to succeed in life, you have to be willing to follow your gut when making decisions. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

The international Bank for Reconstruction & Development (aka the World Bank) turns 50 in 1994. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 24, 1994

"Altogether, a splendid introduction to a full-blast management method that, against the grain, clearly views control as a cooperative proposition."
Brokers occasionally tell enthusiastic investors a gnomic story: only two people in the whole world understand gold; unfortunately, they disagree. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

A wide-ranging if scholarly audit of the extent to which competitive necessity has modified (and should alter) America's workplace practices. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"If you're as smart as Caplan claims, you probably don't need to read this book."
A plodding, repetitive self-help manifesto by psychologist Caplan (Psychiatry/Univ. of Toronto; Between Women, 1981, etc.) that accuses experts in the fields of medicine, law, and psychiatry of deliberately using rank-pulling strategies to intimidate the hapless consumer. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 3, 1994

"In all: an enjoyable history both of commercial aviation and a leading US airline."
On a fascinating and informative journey, reporter and novelist Reiss (The Last Spy, p. 1331, etc.) examines what keeps passengers safe in the air. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Colorful, packed with facts and delivering a clear message: that the risks of investing in biotechnology aren't just high—they're stratospheric."
A you-are-there account of the turbulent early days of Vertex, a high-tech, high-risk biotechnology firm. Read full book review >
CAREER CRASH by Barry Glassner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Timely and readable career advice."
An affable, helpful look at the baby boomer generation's seemingly distinctive form of midlife emergency—losing a job and being unable to find another—by Glassner (Sociology/Univ. of Southern California; Bodies, 1988; Drugs in Adolescent Worlds, 1987). Read full book review >
CITIZEN WORKER by David Montgomery
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"In sum, an academic's informed and densely annotated reflections on the paradox of freedom as it applied to earlier workers; offering few substantive links to 20th-century circumstances, however, the study's appeal appears limited to specialists."
A perceptive but pedantic look at the socioeconomic and political lot of America's 19th-century working class. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >