Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 168)

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2000

"A fair-minded exposition of a politically loaded subject."
Economists Slemrod (Univ. of Michigan) and Bakija (Williams Coll.) provide a sometimes dense but mostly easy-to-read road map of the US tax system. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 20, 2000

"Ultimately boring, but good reference material. (8-page photo insert, not seen)"
An excruciatingly factual account of the "profit taking" schemes that made Thomas Mellon Evans and his corporate-raiding contemporaries fabulously wealthy in the postwar era. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2000

"Greenstein offers a fascinating, if sometimes simplistic, way of considering presidential power—and a timely one in this election year."
Good presidents have solid visions of public policy, communicate them effectively, reconcile conflicting data—and feel good about themselves. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2000

"While perhaps not written for those interested in get-rich-quick schemes, Komisar's account provides enough business tips and Zen-like ideas to inspire would-be entrepreneurs."
Silicon Valley is the backdrop for this helpful book, written by a successful professional business adviser. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"The history and theory and practice of the business of science in business are presented in some detail. The lab coats beat the suits every time."
Technology maven Buderi (The Invention That Changed the World, 1996) tips his reporter's fedora to the corporate laboratories that promise increasingly better living through the wonders of science. His descriptions of futuristic gee-whiz projects are enough to make next year's sci-fi look unimaginative and old-hat. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"Told with wry humor and an insider's view: one can't help but wonder how these wildcatters occupied themselves before 1994."
All about Internet stock traders—those weirdo workaholics who make money, lose money, perpetuate scams, uncover scams, spend hours sending endless (often pointless) e-mails, live at their keyboards, and never seem to make enough to retire and get out of the business. Read full book review >
CITIZEN COORS by Dan Baum
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2000

"Although the narrative is occasionally plodding, Baum's history is incendiary, providing fuel for many a political fire."
An anecdotal history tracing the fortunes of the American brewing family known as much for its right-wing politics as for its suds, written by former Wall Street Journal reporter Baum (Smoke and Mirrors, 1996). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2000

"It is not necessary to be an environmental activist to find this a compelling portrait of a young woman of remarkable fortitude and dedication. (40 b&w photographs, not seen)"
A charged first-person account by an ardent environmental activist whose long-term occupation of a giant redwood tree focused public attention on the cutting of old-growth redwood forests in northern California. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2000

"A revealing, often surprising glimpse into the mind and emotions of one analyst and her participation in the therapeutic process."
Six tales of imaginary encounters between a psychoanalyst and her patients that dramatically illustrate what the experience of psychoanalytic therapy is like from an analyst's point of view. Read full book review >
DREAMBIRDS by Rob Nixon
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2000

"Readers may just want to bury their heads in the sand."
Nixon links his personal memoirs to the natural and cultural history of the ostrich, only to produce a narrative with as little hope of flight as the dreambird itself. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 16, 2000

"A smart and engaging book about money and the American ways with it. (Author tour)"
The host of "Marketplace," NPR's popular program about money, travels the country, Candide-like, in search of ways to spend a relatively small sum. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 9, 2000

"Standard business leadership exhortations, already well-trafficked by the likes of Tom Peters and, for that matter, good old Road Runner himself. (B&w cartoons throughout) ($100,000 ad/promo)"
Sensible and decent, albeit hyperventilated and not exactly original, behavioral advice for business managers in the new millennium, served up by consultants Bell and Harari. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >