Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 168)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Perceptive, low-key perspectives on how thoroughly modern organization men and women could, with a bit of thought, profit from the past. (Ten line drawings, maps)"
Most of those who use the days of yore to catechize or instruct corporate executives go no further than military history. Read full book review >
IN THE RINGS OF SATURN by Joe Sherman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"While tellingly detailed in many respects, Sherman's narrative wanders all over the lot, fragmenting its focus—and impact. (Six photographs, line drawings—not seen)"
A wide-ranging and ultimately diffuse reconstruction of how General Motors managed to launch a breakthrough line of popularly priced small passenger cars under the Saturn aegis at a time when the parent organization was experiencing convulsive financial, governance, and sales difficulties. Read full book review >

CRISIS INVESTING FOR THE REST OF THE '90s by Douglas Casey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"An offbeat investment guide that poses an idiosyncratic challenge to conventional wisdom and pieties. (Helpful charts and tabular material throughout)"
Among the high-profile fortunetellers who profitably dispense doomsday fiscal counsel (Batra, Browne, Granville, Ruff, et al.), Casey ranks as one of the few with real insight. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Sluggish but worth wading through. (Appendix predicting the future of retailing; 16 pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
An autobiographical account of the rise and fall of one of the nation's most dazzling shopping emporiums, written by its former longtime chairman, a hale-fellow-well-met who, in the late 1980's, was forced out by Canadian Robert Campeau, presaging the end of a hugely profitable and idiosyncratic retailing era. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"Worst-case scenarios that afford fans of the doomsday genre a multiple choice of bang-or-whimper endings for a weary world."
An appraisal of armed conflict that will strike most readers as a typically slick Alvin Toffler production—despite the byline given to wife Heidi and the bulletin that Alvin wrote Future Shock, The Third Wave, and other bestsellers with her help. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"A generally—and ironically—self-centered exercise in the economics of meaning, whose appeal seems limited largely to true believers."
A down-east entrepreneur's slick and assured account of how he brought his company into the light, thereby showing the way for less advanced enterprises. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 14, 1993

"Those seeking up-to-date guidance on the lessons to be learned from IBM should turn to Paul Carroll's estimable Big Blues (reviewed below)."
In light of last month's announcement that IBM was taking an $8.9-billion charge against second-quarter earnings and eliminating another 85,000 jobs, the incredibly upbeat subtitle of this parochial case study appears to have been overtaken by events—and is simply misleading. Read full book review >
THE ENDANGERED AMERICAN DREAM by Edward N. Luttwak
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 14, 1993

"A shrill wake-up call to arms."
Having made a name for himself as a military sage, Luttwak (Strategy, 1987, etc.) now turns his attention to geoeconomics—the battleground on which, he asserts, a self-defeating US must best commercial rivals if it's to thrive in the wake of the USSR's collapse. Read full book review >
UP THE AGENCY by Peter Mayle
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Should hit big among Madison Avenue masochists, less big elsewhere."
Generalities about advertising by the tireless Mayle, whose first novel, Hotel Pastis, is reviewed above. Read full book review >
SOAP OPERA by Alecia Swasy
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 4, 1993

"Must reading, however, for company watchers, P&G shareholders, curious consumers, and citizens of Cincinnati. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs)"
Wall Street Journal reporter Swasy was, she tell us, spied upon, followed, and bugged while writing this admirable—if ultimately somewhat disappointing—history of the dark side of Ivory-soap and Tide manufacturer Proctor & Gamble. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A perceptive evaluation of a pivotal financial institution that's been overtaken by events it helped precipitate."
A savvy audit of the Bundesbank, which, the author observes, ``has replaced the Wehrmacht as Germany's best-known and most feared institution.'' Marsh (chief European correspondent for London's Financial Times; The Germans, 1990) offers an accessible, often absorbing, appraisal of the Federal Republic's Frankfurt-based central bank, whose ``anti-inflationary rectitude'' has made it a power to be reckoned with in global finance. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Impressive research and a clear message—if somewhat tedious in the telling."
An earnest dissertation on environmentalism as a complex social movement that began in response to industrialization, urbanization, and the closing of the frontier. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer
authors of OFF THE PAGE
May 19, 2015

Meet Oliver, a prince literally taken from the pages of a fairy tale and transported into the real world. Meet Delilah, the girl who wished Oliver into being. In bestseller Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer’s new young adult novel, Off the Page, it’s a miracle that seems perfect at first—but there are complications. To exist in Delilah’s world, Oliver must take the place of a regular boy. Enter Edgar, who agrees to play Oliver’s role in the pages of Delilah’s favorite book. But just when it seems that the plan will work, everything gets turned upside down. We talk to the mother-daughter team on Kirkus TV. View video >