Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 168)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

A wide-ranging if scholarly audit of the extent to which competitive necessity has modified (and should alter) America's workplace practices. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"If you're as smart as Caplan claims, you probably don't need to read this book."
A plodding, repetitive self-help manifesto by psychologist Caplan (Psychiatry/Univ. of Toronto; Between Women, 1981, etc.) that accuses experts in the fields of medicine, law, and psychiatry of deliberately using rank-pulling strategies to intimidate the hapless consumer. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 3, 1994

"In all: an enjoyable history both of commercial aviation and a leading US airline."
On a fascinating and informative journey, reporter and novelist Reiss (The Last Spy, p. 1331, etc.) examines what keeps passengers safe in the air. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Colorful, packed with facts and delivering a clear message: that the risks of investing in biotechnology aren't just high—they're stratospheric."
A you-are-there account of the turbulent early days of Vertex, a high-tech, high-risk biotechnology firm. Read full book review >
CAREER CRASH by Barry Glassner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Timely and readable career advice."
An affable, helpful look at the baby boomer generation's seemingly distinctive form of midlife emergency—losing a job and being unable to find another—by Glassner (Sociology/Univ. of Southern California; Bodies, 1988; Drugs in Adolescent Worlds, 1987). Read full book review >

CITIZEN WORKER by David Montgomery
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"In sum, an academic's informed and densely annotated reflections on the paradox of freedom as it applied to earlier workers; offering few substantive links to 20th-century circumstances, however, the study's appeal appears limited to specialists."
A perceptive but pedantic look at the socioeconomic and political lot of America's 19th-century working class. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Wide-angle perspectives that afford a framework for assessing a widening world's increasingly intertwined economy."
A measured, anecdotally documented brief for the proposition that a few hundred corporate leviathans have gained a controlling interest in the world economy—at no small cost to national and local governments striving to preserve a sense of community. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

"Another slick status report on putatively earth-shaking shifts in the increasingly interdependent but fragmenting global economy from a past master of the futurist game."
Naisbitt (Megatrends 2000, etc.) here focuses on an apparent incongruity, if not contradiction, in the Global Village's premillennial, post-cold war order. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 17, 1994

"A thoughtful analysis of an extraordinarily complex problem, as well as a concise summary of feminist thought over the past four decades: of appeal to anyone interested in understanding the feminist revolution."
A subtle and sensitive exploration of why professional women continue to fail at achieving equality with men in the workplace: a follow-up to Apter's Why Women Don't Have Wives (1985). Read full book review >
THE AMAZONIAN CHRONICLES by Jacques Meunier
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 10, 1994

"As lush and deadly as the Amazon it maps."
A hyperbolic paean to the Amazon rain forest: said to be a 1991 French bestseller. Read full book review >
SILENT DEPRESSION by Wallace C. Peterson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Peterson's solutions aren't as revolutionary as he claims, but he presents them—and his telling analysis—with clarity and force."
A proficient analysis of what ails the American economy- -which, according to economist Peterson, has been in a ``silent depression'' since 1973. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

From prolific historian Smith (Killing the Spirit, 1990; Redeeming the Time, 1986, etc.): a genealogy of democracy that rejects Max Weber's ``Protestant ethic''—which equates democracy, Christianity, and capitalism—and instead places the democratic impulse squarely in the Christian communalist tradition. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jenny Han
July 6, 2015

In Jenny Han’s P.S. I Still Love You, Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter. She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever. When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once? In this charming and heartfelt sequel to the New York Times bestseller To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, we see first love through the eyes of the unforgettable Lara Jean. Love is never easy, but maybe that’s part of makes it so amazing. View video >