Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 170)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1994

"You've heard all this New Age-speak before, but the individual stories—most of them lively and fresh—save Schultz's rendering from being trite."
Mixing Jungian psychology and New Age physics with the homespun philosophies of successful entrepreneurs, business-writer Schultz (coauthor: Cashing Out, 1991—not reviewed) concludes that if you want to succeed in life, you have to be willing to follow your gut when making decisions. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

The international Bank for Reconstruction & Development (aka the World Bank) turns 50 in 1994. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 24, 1994

"Altogether, a splendid introduction to a full-blast management method that, against the grain, clearly views control as a cooperative proposition."
Brokers occasionally tell enthusiastic investors a gnomic story: only two people in the whole world understand gold; unfortunately, they disagree. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

A wide-ranging if scholarly audit of the extent to which competitive necessity has modified (and should alter) America's workplace practices. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"If you're as smart as Caplan claims, you probably don't need to read this book."
A plodding, repetitive self-help manifesto by psychologist Caplan (Psychiatry/Univ. of Toronto; Between Women, 1981, etc.) that accuses experts in the fields of medicine, law, and psychiatry of deliberately using rank-pulling strategies to intimidate the hapless consumer. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 3, 1994

"In all: an enjoyable history both of commercial aviation and a leading US airline."
On a fascinating and informative journey, reporter and novelist Reiss (The Last Spy, p. 1331, etc.) examines what keeps passengers safe in the air. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Colorful, packed with facts and delivering a clear message: that the risks of investing in biotechnology aren't just high—they're stratospheric."
A you-are-there account of the turbulent early days of Vertex, a high-tech, high-risk biotechnology firm. Read full book review >
CAREER CRASH by Barry Glassner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Timely and readable career advice."
An affable, helpful look at the baby boomer generation's seemingly distinctive form of midlife emergency—losing a job and being unable to find another—by Glassner (Sociology/Univ. of Southern California; Bodies, 1988; Drugs in Adolescent Worlds, 1987). Read full book review >
CITIZEN WORKER by David Montgomery
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"In sum, an academic's informed and densely annotated reflections on the paradox of freedom as it applied to earlier workers; offering few substantive links to 20th-century circumstances, however, the study's appeal appears limited to specialists."
A perceptive but pedantic look at the socioeconomic and political lot of America's 19th-century working class. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Wide-angle perspectives that afford a framework for assessing a widening world's increasingly intertwined economy."
A measured, anecdotally documented brief for the proposition that a few hundred corporate leviathans have gained a controlling interest in the world economy—at no small cost to national and local governments striving to preserve a sense of community. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

"Another slick status report on putatively earth-shaking shifts in the increasingly interdependent but fragmenting global economy from a past master of the futurist game."
Naisbitt (Megatrends 2000, etc.) here focuses on an apparent incongruity, if not contradiction, in the Global Village's premillennial, post-cold war order. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 17, 1994

"A thoughtful analysis of an extraordinarily complex problem, as well as a concise summary of feminist thought over the past four decades: of appeal to anyone interested in understanding the feminist revolution."
A subtle and sensitive exploration of why professional women continue to fail at achieving equality with men in the workplace: a follow-up to Apter's Why Women Don't Have Wives (1985). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >