Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 171)

MONEY AND MORALS IN AMERICA by Patricia O’Toole
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 13, 1998

"This book succeeds because O'Toole is serious about morality without being preachy and accepts the appeal of wealth without worshiping mammon while addressing a subject where Americans often do both."
A light look at a heavy subject, the conflicting imperatives of wealth and commonwealth. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1998

"Readers who like their Machiavellian theory dumbed down will find this book of value."
Historical anecdotes coupled with nostrums for the business-as-warfare crowd. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1998

"It deserves and will surely gain a wide audience. ($100,000 ad/promo; author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Consuming more now and enjoying it less? Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1998

"More than the average person would ever care to know about signage, but a serviceable history for lighting and marketing buffs nonetheless. (48 b&w photos, not seen)"
A fairly pedantic and at times self-serving walk through the signs of our times. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 27, 1998

"Nevertheless, Wasserstein's effort is informative and entertaining. (Radio satellite tour)"
Everything you could ever want to know about big business deals (as long as you don't want to think too deeply about them). Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 4, 1998

"Students of Indian policy will find this a useful reference. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen; 6 maps)"
A detail-packed survey of the manifold conquest of North America. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1998

"An archetypal text, true to life on the Street, destined to be discussed over drinks at trader hangouts after the market closes—and better than going tapioca. (Author tour; radio satellite tour)"
A Wall Street trader exercises a rich man's prerogative and offers financial advice and his life story. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1998

"Davis and Wessel's arguments are not always new and not always convincing, yet they bring to this work elements often missing from popular writing on the technological future: solid reporting, detailed research, and a regard for historical context. (Author tour)"
The American middle class has remained economically stagnant for the past 25 years, despite endless prophecies during this time that computer technology would bring a new age of productivity and prosperity; the authors, both with the Wall Street Journal, explain why this has been so and why it may soon change. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1998

"Ch†vez skillfully shows the upside and downside to each argument and each outcome, and her ability to turn the subject of a plebiscite into a compelling, widely relevant, and instructive study is admirable."
paper 0-520-21344-0 A strong yet impartial look at the beginning of the end of affirmative action in the US, by a self-proclaimed recipient of its benefits. Read full book review >
THE SWISS, THE GOLD, AND THE DEAD by Jean Ziegler
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 31, 1998

"A solid and sober contribution to a growing subspecialty of wartime and Holocaust history, rightfully sardonic."
Swiss sociologist Ziegler (Geneva Univ.) excoriates the gnomes of Zurich, the bankers of Basle and all the rest of his countrymen who, he reveals, gave steady and material aid to the Third Reich. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 16, 1998

"Sometimes too airily dismissive of legitimate challenges, for all that, never less than scintillating, witty, and brilliant."
An enormously erudite and provocative history of how wealth and power became so unevenly distributed between the West and the rest of the world. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >