Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 171)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A perceptive overview, then, of a consequential clash among the world's economic superpowers."
A journalist's savvy appraisal of how corporate America and Japan, Inc., measure up against a more or less united European Community in the trilateral struggle for economic ascendancy in Europe. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A bleak view of the press by one who's in a position to know."
A trenchant and disturbing analysis of the transformation of newspapers from gatherers of news to profitable corporate assets, by the former editor of the Chicago Tribune. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A thorough evaluation of a capitalist whose often stormy career commands respect and attention. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A Pulitzer-winning journalist's hard-hitting take on Frederick W. Smith, the offbeat entrepreneur who launched and still runs Federal Express. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 26, 1993

More business-oriented advice and cheerleading from Mackay (Beware the Naked Man Who Offers You His Shirt, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"Not a primer in the theory and practice of futures trading, which can be understood only partially by reading between the lines—but full of fascinating historical tidbits lying beneath the promotional blitz."
Forty essays and speeches, many dating back to the 1970's, by the ex-chairman of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME). Read full book review >

KILLING THE SACRED COWS by Ann Crittenden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"A thought-provoking, if scattershot, tract."
A progressive's remedies for perceived ills allegedly created by Reaganomics. Read full book review >
VICTORY SECRETS OF ATTILA THE HUN by Wess Roberts
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 6, 1993

"A decidedly different sort of management guide—and one whose purposefully perverse protagonist still commands serious attention."
A welcome return for one of publishing's more implausible—and popular—paradigms (Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun, 1989), giving Roberts (Straight A`s Never Made Anybody Rich, 1991) a chance to offer crafty counsel on what it takes to create and run a prospering enterprise. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A challenging analysis of how the world really works."
While the world is shrinking in many ways, globally dispersed ethnic groups—according to this provocative account by Kotkin (West Coast editor of Inc.; coauthor, The Third Century, 1988, etc.)—are playing pivotal roles in shaping its economic future. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"20, but the authors' prose and prescriptions are far from clear, marred by bad grammar, jargon, and patches of supreme self-evidence. (Five line illustrations.)"
American business schools fail to produce savvy international corporate managers because the schools' philosophical and technical biases are narrow, Cartesian-based, and one-dimensional—and so don't provide the tools to master increasingly complex marketing and production problems. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A truly original thesis that, unfortunately, has a ragged seam down the middle."
When Paepke, a lawyer and former research chemist, refers to ``human transformation'' in this fascinating though somewhat uneven exploration of our economic future, he doesn't mean the human- potential movement. Read full book review >
MANAGING AT THE SPEED OF CHANGE by Daryl R. Conner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A schematic diagram that will prove both useful and reassuring but that fails to address the layperson's most basic question about change: Why must it happen at all?"
``Change doctor'' and corporate-crisis intervener Conner explains why some managers instinctively thrive on change while others founder and fail, and how the latter can learn to be more like the former. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Pealeism'' (George's coinage) with intelligence and tact: first-rate. (Thirty halftones—not seen.)"
A sympathetic biography of the controversial preacher that situates him in the mainstream of the American populist religious tradition. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >