Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 171)

COD by Mark Kurlansky
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Cod—that whitest of the white-fleshed fish, prize of every fish-and-chips establishment—gets expert, loving, and encyclopedic handling from Food and Wine columnist Kurlansky (A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"While optimistic about many consultants, however, the authors warn companies to be wary of too much good advice. (Author tour)"
A look into the insular and highly confidential world of consulting firms like Bain & Co., Andersen Consulting, McKinsey & Co., and Deloitte & Touche. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 16, 1997

"A first-rate work of journalism in the public interest."
A disquieting, highly effective assault on the American way of producing and eating food. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 16, 1997

"If Chernow provides no breakthrough perspectives to arrest the attention of professionals, he delivers a sound, accessible account of the forces shaping capital, credit, currency, and securities markets on the eve of a new millennium."
Three ad rem essays from National Book Award winner Chernow on the convulsive shift in the balance of monetary power (from commercial, investment, and merchant bankers to financial conglomerates) that has marked 20th-century capitalism. Read full book review >
THE UNDERTAKING by Thomas Lynch
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"Already excerpted in Harper's and the London Review of Books, this thoughtful volume is neither too sentimental nor too clinical about death's role (and the author's) in our lives. (illustrations, not seen)"
Eloquent, meditative observations on the place of death in small-town life, from the only poet/funeral director in Milford, Mich. Read full book review >

CRY BLOODY MURDER by Elaine DePrince
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"HIV catastrophe."
With estimable dignity, a mother recounts the horrendous tragedy her family suffered when, due to the scandalous indifference of certain pharmaceutical companies, the medicines her sons used became deadly poisons. Read full book review >
WALL STREET by Doug Henwood
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"Next assignment: Present the same ideas in a more accessible form to a wider audience."
Wall Street mavens who hate challenges to their self-serving worldview will not enjoy this book. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"An appealing and often amusing history of a less-than-noble drink, written with style and a genuine appreciation for the good old days before Miller Time went global. (Author tour)"
An industry insider's account of how B-school grads with no brew experience became the nation's tastemakers. Read full book review >
MONEY by Andrew Hacker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 17, 1997

"An academic's discontinuous and vaguely discontented survey of the way the money goes in latter-day America."
Anecdotal audits of American assets and incomes that (like Wall Street's jest about economists laid end-to-end) never reaches a conclusion. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 12, 1997

"A deliberately provocative text whose subtext seems to be that the world and transnational enterprises owe US workers a better living. (Author tour)"
A bleak antimarket assessment of the postCold War outlook for American workers. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1997

"A blurred picture of an enterprise whose triumphs and travails are not to be captured in the editorial equivalent of tintypes. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A journalist's unfocused take on Eastman Kodak and the ripple effects its troubles have caused over the past decade or more. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 21, 1997

"A call to arms for corporate America, more interesting for its details on new foreign markets than for its rather vague prescriptions. (illustrations, not seen)"
Having identified Germany and Japan as America's principal challengers for economic dominion in A Cold Peace (1992), Garten changes his mind and policy recommendations in this didactic briefing on up-and-coming rivals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >