Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 171)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A challenging analysis of how the world really works."
While the world is shrinking in many ways, globally dispersed ethnic groups—according to this provocative account by Kotkin (West Coast editor of Inc.; coauthor, The Third Century, 1988, etc.)—are playing pivotal roles in shaping its economic future. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"20, but the authors' prose and prescriptions are far from clear, marred by bad grammar, jargon, and patches of supreme self-evidence. (Five line illustrations.)"
American business schools fail to produce savvy international corporate managers because the schools' philosophical and technical biases are narrow, Cartesian-based, and one-dimensional—and so don't provide the tools to master increasingly complex marketing and production problems. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A truly original thesis that, unfortunately, has a ragged seam down the middle."
When Paepke, a lawyer and former research chemist, refers to ``human transformation'' in this fascinating though somewhat uneven exploration of our economic future, he doesn't mean the human- potential movement. Read full book review >
MANAGING AT THE SPEED OF CHANGE by Daryl R. Conner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A schematic diagram that will prove both useful and reassuring but that fails to address the layperson's most basic question about change: Why must it happen at all?"
``Change doctor'' and corporate-crisis intervener Conner explains why some managers instinctively thrive on change while others founder and fail, and how the latter can learn to be more like the former. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Pealeism'' (George's coinage) with intelligence and tact: first-rate. (Thirty halftones—not seen.)"
A sympathetic biography of the controversial preacher that situates him in the mainstream of the American populist religious tradition. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 28, 1992

"A timely, accessible wake-up call for policy-makers—and those who put them in office."
The end of the cold war has caused socioeconomic dislocations as Pentagon suppliers adapt to new realities. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"An intricate analysis rather than a denunciation—but in focusing on the day-to-day activities of a handful of highly skilled lobbyists, Birnbaum conveys the ambiguous relationship between Congress and those who solicit its favors."
An attempt to convey how lobbyists really work in Washington, by Wall Street Journal reporter Birnbaum (coauthor, Showdown at Gucci Gulch, 1987). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"An outlander's illuminating, cautionary briefing on an odyssey in what once was envisioned a workers' paradise. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A Western executive's fascinating account of the toil and trouble attendant to opening a Moscow office for a transnational ad agency. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Aside from an apparent moral blindness about everything but good manners—a very droll read."
Further adventures in smugness by the aloof major-domo, or household manager, who told about the riotous horrors of his life with Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue in That Girl and Phil (coauthored with Cherkinian, 1990). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 17, 1992

"The new republic's principals had best hope that their business has firmer foundations and better organization than their book—which, most assuredly, won't be everyone's cup of tea. (Seventy-five line drawings.)"
A tedious the-journey-is-the-reward exercise in launching a business. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

"A graceless, labor-of-love memoir. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
An amateurish genealogical exercise whose appeal for general readers is limited largely to a reverent profile of Asa G. Candler, Sr., the go-getting pharmacist who acquired rights to an unsung patent medicine known as Pemberton's Tonic and renamed it Coca- Cola. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

"As accessible and credible an explanation of Milken's misdeeds as has yet appeared."
A hard-hitting analysis of how Michael Milken contrived to add junk bonds to the tricks of Wall Street's trade. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >