Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 171)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A clever, invaluable zoomorphic study with a wealth of information on what makes the rich tick. (Photo insert)"
Conniff, who specializes in the animal world (Every Creepy Thing, 1998, etc.), casts an inquisitive eye on the human race's big dogs in their diverse habitats, from the Breakers to Blenheim. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Accomplished but finally dispiriting, as the wry, revealing dialogue and gritty South Philly detail give way to sour cynicism."
Drawing on the series of articles he wrote for The Philadelphia Inquirer's Sunday magazine, bestselling author Bowden (Black Hawk Down, 1999, etc.) tells the comic but ultimately pathetic true story of a loser whose life turned upside down when he stumbled on $1.2 million. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"There are sure to be many accounts of Enron's collapse, but Bryce's gossipy version will be hard to beat for sheer readability."
An Austin-based reporter delivers the behind-the-scenes story of Enron's rise and fall. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 2002

"Readers on all sides of the taxation issue will find useful material in Weisman's fluent narrative, solid proof that financial history need not be dull."
A book to warm an IRS agent's heart: a lucid history and careful defense of the US income tax. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A gentle, clear, and accessible hornbook that should crowd out many other general texts."
In just a few easy lessons, economics journalist Wheelan can teach the most innocent reader to think like an economist. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Best when Owings steps back and lets the women speak for themselves."
From the author of Frauen (1993), another oral history of female experience, this one depicting food servers in American restaurants, ranging from upscale to fast food. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"More diagnosis than prescription, but the epidemiological view of swollen-wallet sickness makes for highly interesting reading."
The First World is fat but not happy, and its consumerist ways are spreading like an epidemic to the farthest reaches of the globe. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Thoughtful and massive: too much for any but the most serious public-policy wonk."
An academic who works both sides of the Atlantic takes a serious look at the dire condition of Anglo-Saxon pensions. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Gossipy and superficial, but a worthy companion to such kindred works as The Late Show, Microserfs, and Barbarians at the Gate."
A rueful memoir by a young Enron acolyte who saw his dreams of wealth go down in flames—and here gets a little payback. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Gimlet-eyed, ethically poised history: readers will have plenty to think about the next time they visit one of those prettily restored mill museums. (8-page photo insert)"
Former CBS News producer Moran examines the broken promises that led to abysmal conditions in the New England textile mills and then to sharp retaliatory responses by their workers. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 7, 2002

"Brisk, bouncy, elastic, and exciting."
A fresh, frisky, and funny bio cum industrial history featuring the stereotypical monomaniacal inventor who ignores public opinion and the disdain of family and friends and lives long enough to enjoy seeing them all dine on substantial portions of crow. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 2002

"Proves without a doubt that even masters of the universe sometimes lose their heads, and then their shirts."
Knowing inside account of the major media conglomerates' efforts to embrace and profit from the '90s dot.com boom. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >