Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 174)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"The scrupulously documented text has 16 pages of photos (not seen)."
An illuminating, unsentimental biography of William H. Gates III, youthful cofounder of Microsoft—the multibillion-dollar enterprise that dominates the world of PC software. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Out of this clutch will emerge a memorable few, and Shabecoff's offering, despite its flaws, has the breadth and acuity to be among them."
A wide-ranging and detailed survey of the U.S. environmental tradition from ancient Americans to Al Gore, with cogitations on the squandering, sullying, and disfiguring of our land; by former veteran New York Times correspondent Shabecoff. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A perceptive overview, then, of a consequential clash among the world's economic superpowers."
A journalist's savvy appraisal of how corporate America and Japan, Inc., measure up against a more or less united European Community in the trilateral struggle for economic ascendancy in Europe. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A bleak view of the press by one who's in a position to know."
A trenchant and disturbing analysis of the transformation of newspapers from gatherers of news to profitable corporate assets, by the former editor of the Chicago Tribune. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A thorough evaluation of a capitalist whose often stormy career commands respect and attention. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A Pulitzer-winning journalist's hard-hitting take on Frederick W. Smith, the offbeat entrepreneur who launched and still runs Federal Express. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 26, 1993

More business-oriented advice and cheerleading from Mackay (Beware the Naked Man Who Offers You His Shirt, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"Not a primer in the theory and practice of futures trading, which can be understood only partially by reading between the lines—but full of fascinating historical tidbits lying beneath the promotional blitz."
Forty essays and speeches, many dating back to the 1970's, by the ex-chairman of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME). Read full book review >
KILLING THE SACRED COWS by Ann Crittenden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"A thought-provoking, if scattershot, tract."
A progressive's remedies for perceived ills allegedly created by Reaganomics. Read full book review >
VICTORY SECRETS OF ATTILA THE HUN by Wess Roberts
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 6, 1993

"A decidedly different sort of management guide—and one whose purposefully perverse protagonist still commands serious attention."
A welcome return for one of publishing's more implausible—and popular—paradigms (Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun, 1989), giving Roberts (Straight A`s Never Made Anybody Rich, 1991) a chance to offer crafty counsel on what it takes to create and run a prospering enterprise. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A challenging analysis of how the world really works."
While the world is shrinking in many ways, globally dispersed ethnic groups—according to this provocative account by Kotkin (West Coast editor of Inc.; coauthor, The Third Century, 1988, etc.)—are playing pivotal roles in shaping its economic future. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"20, but the authors' prose and prescriptions are far from clear, marred by bad grammar, jargon, and patches of supreme self-evidence. (Five line illustrations.)"
American business schools fail to produce savvy international corporate managers because the schools' philosophical and technical biases are narrow, Cartesian-based, and one-dimensional—and so don't provide the tools to master increasingly complex marketing and production problems. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A truly original thesis that, unfortunately, has a ragged seam down the middle."
When Paepke, a lawyer and former research chemist, refers to ``human transformation'' in this fascinating though somewhat uneven exploration of our economic future, he doesn't mean the human- potential movement. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >