Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 174)

HITLER'S BANKER by John Weitz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

This biography of a major figure of the Nazi regime raises tough ethical questions about the nature of collaboration and patriotism. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"A first-rate anecdotal briefing on a consequential supplier of small wonders that are at the heart of a latter-day industrial revolution."
A lively, accessible, and informative overview of Intel Corp., the Silicon Valley phenomenon that bestrides the widening world of semiconductor devices like a colossus. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Written in the present tense with a touch of tense presence, the vignettes, while not earthshaking, provide salty, easy, lively city kibitzing."
Kostman, a licensed Big Apple locksmith, certainly gets around the city in the pursuit of his profession. Read full book review >
NIXON'S TEN COMMANDMENTS OF STATECRAFT by James C. Humes
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Most interesting as an example of the movement to rehabilitate Nixon's reputation, but also worth reading as a treatise on diplomacy."
The insights available here are not limited to those intended by the author. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"This is not the serious work we have come to expect from Novak. (Author tour)"
Glimpses of a fruitful discussion can be found here, despite the effort to hide them behind erudite claptrap. Read full book review >

AROUND THE BLOCK by Tom Shachtman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Despite the limitations of his pedestrian prose style, Shachtman conveys the drama of simple daily life in New York small business, and no one who reads this will ever walk down a city street and see it in quite the same way again. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
Shachtman returns to the turf of his 1991 Skyscraper Dreams, the business world of New York City, for a study of one year in the life of an urban block. Read full book review >
FROZEN DESIRE by James Buchan
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"These often murky essays will add precious little to anyone's understanding of what makes the world go around."
A discursive and idiosyncratic appreciation of currency, from British novelist and former Financial Times correspondent Buchan (High Latitudes, 1996, etc.), who, the subtitle notwithstanding, never manages to construe its many-splendored meanings. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An argument better framed would have done his cause much greater service."
An overly shrill indictment of transnational corporations' leading role in environmental havoc—but an indictment that nonetheless finds its mark. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A clear, angry, important (though interim) work that treats significant matters with clarity and intelligence. (8 pages photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A journalist for Toronto's Globe and Mail details the continuing, wretched story of Swiss collusion, as financiers and dealers in stolen goods, with Nazi Germany. Read full book review >
EUROPE ADRIFT by John Newhouse
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 1997

"An illuminating audit of the credits and debits amassed by the decidedly strange bedfellows constituting today's EU. (Author tour; radio satellite tour)"
A veteran correspondent's bleak appraisal of the state of the European Union on the eve of a new millennium. Read full book review >
REACHING BEYOND RACE by Paul M. Sniderman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 1997

"This monograph's exploration of undisclosed racial attitudes among whites is challenging, but the analysis and conclusions about how to pull a racially fragmented society together are less impressive. (26 line illustrations, not seen)"
A fascinating analysis of white Americans' attitudes on race, by two political scientists who argue strenuously, though not entirely convincingly, that our leaders would be more effective in forging multiracial consensus and coalition to improve social and economic access for all citizens if they appealed to ``moral principles that reach beyond race.'' Conscious of contemporary Americans' growing cynicism about both race and public-opinion polls, Sniderman (Stanford Univ.) and Carmines (Indiana Univ.) devised techniques using computer-assisted public-opinion research to uncover attitudes among white respondents that might otherwise be obscured by self-conscious efforts to make their answers conform to ``politically correct'' standards. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 19, 1997

"Even a quick dip into this collection will convince you of that."
The Bering Sea in January can be a mean place, as Walker (Working on the Edge, 1991) relates in this spine-tingling (if redundant) collection—particularly when the winds clip by at 100 mph, the waves crest at 60 feet, the water temperature is 38 degrees, it's nightime, and your boat is sinking. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >