Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 174)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A timely reminder that the blessings of America's good times remain unequally distributed."
An academic's arresting appraisal of what he deems a serious lack of employment opportunity in a booming domestic economy. Read full book review >
JUGGLING by Jane S. Gould
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Despite this admitted shortcoming and the occasional excess of personal information, Juggling provides an honest and insightful consideration of one courageous woman's experience."
A sobering account of women's struggle for opportunity and equality in the work force, seen through the eyes of one of the leaders in the fight. Read full book review >

COD by Mark Kurlansky
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Cod—that whitest of the white-fleshed fish, prize of every fish-and-chips establishment—gets expert, loving, and encyclopedic handling from Food and Wine columnist Kurlansky (A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"While optimistic about many consultants, however, the authors warn companies to be wary of too much good advice. (Author tour)"
A look into the insular and highly confidential world of consulting firms like Bain & Co., Andersen Consulting, McKinsey & Co., and Deloitte & Touche. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 16, 1997

"A first-rate work of journalism in the public interest."
A disquieting, highly effective assault on the American way of producing and eating food. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 16, 1997

"If Chernow provides no breakthrough perspectives to arrest the attention of professionals, he delivers a sound, accessible account of the forces shaping capital, credit, currency, and securities markets on the eve of a new millennium."
Three ad rem essays from National Book Award winner Chernow on the convulsive shift in the balance of monetary power (from commercial, investment, and merchant bankers to financial conglomerates) that has marked 20th-century capitalism. Read full book review >
THE UNDERTAKING by Thomas Lynch
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"Already excerpted in Harper's and the London Review of Books, this thoughtful volume is neither too sentimental nor too clinical about death's role (and the author's) in our lives. (illustrations, not seen)"
Eloquent, meditative observations on the place of death in small-town life, from the only poet/funeral director in Milford, Mich. Read full book review >
CRY BLOODY MURDER by Elaine DePrince
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"HIV catastrophe."
With estimable dignity, a mother recounts the horrendous tragedy her family suffered when, due to the scandalous indifference of certain pharmaceutical companies, the medicines her sons used became deadly poisons. Read full book review >
WALL STREET by Doug Henwood
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"Next assignment: Present the same ideas in a more accessible form to a wider audience."
Wall Street mavens who hate challenges to their self-serving worldview will not enjoy this book. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"An appealing and often amusing history of a less-than-noble drink, written with style and a genuine appreciation for the good old days before Miller Time went global. (Author tour)"
An industry insider's account of how B-school grads with no brew experience became the nation's tastemakers. Read full book review >
MONEY by Andrew Hacker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 17, 1997

"An academic's discontinuous and vaguely discontented survey of the way the money goes in latter-day America."
Anecdotal audits of American assets and incomes that (like Wall Street's jest about economists laid end-to-end) never reaches a conclusion. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 12, 1997

"A deliberately provocative text whose subtext seems to be that the world and transnational enterprises owe US workers a better living. (Author tour)"
A bleak antimarket assessment of the postCold War outlook for American workers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >