Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 174)

INSIDE THE STRIKE ZONE by Randal Hendricks
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Tenaciously dull writing, but essential for anyone wishing to understand the business of baseball and how it got that way."
A labored, slanted, but worthwhile discussion of the often bizarre financial dealings of baseball, by a major player in the evolution of free agency and escalating salaries. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Mainly for students and policy wonks."
A pointed reinterpretation of the history of antipoverty policy, arguing that racism most explains why our welfare state is feeble compared with other industrialized nations. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

Freelance journalist Shear arrestingly reconstructs a notably bad bargain the US struck with Japan during a period when, despite an immense trade deficit, Washington was willing to pay almost any price to keep the island nation on its side in the Cold War. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"You'll want to avert your eyes as Kunen recreates the accident in all its blood and tears, but hang on for some impressive corporate muckraking. (8 pages of b&w photos, not seen)"
Part tabloid-style tearjerker, part sophisticated corporate exposÇ, by a former People magazine crime writer and bestselling author (The Strawberry Statement, 1969). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 31, 1994

"Kaufman comes across as a blend of science fetishist, free- market wonk, and immense sour grape—his good points sadly lost in the blather."
In classic jilted-lover style, former environmental activist Kaufman (The Beaches Are Moving, 1979) levels some sharp and deserving criticisms at the environmental movement, but loses credibility when he just can't find one good word for his former partner. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 22, 1994

"While the absorbing text includes statistical assurances as to air travel's relative safety, its behind-the-scenes reportage on JFK is not calculated to instill much confidence in either frequent or occasional fliers."
Just when you thought it was safe to fly away on a summer holiday, along comes this almost indecently gleeful reminder that the sky, even more than the sea, can be terribly unforgiving of mistakes. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 3, 1994

"An engaging audit of a corporate phenomenon that wisely eschews what-it-all-means analysis in favor of a vivid narrative that can speak for itself. (80 photos, not seen) ($30,000 ad promo; author tour)"
An informative and agreeably anecdotal history of the Atlanta- based multinational that, despite the best efforts of archrival PepsiCo, continues to bestride the global soft-drink trade like a colossus. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Now that's okay (unless you're a cow), but a cash-register makes a poor pulpit."
It is quite possible that thousands of years from now, forensic cultural criticism will determine that motivational speaking and inspirational books acted upon our minds in much the same way as lead poisoning acted upon the minds of the citizens of the latter Roman Empire. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"This testament to how deeply jobs shape workers' lives is as invaluable a cultural document as Susan Orleans's Saturday Night. (Photos, not seen) (First serial to Esquire)"
This chronicle of freelance journalist Snowden's year in the trenches of America's work force could well serve as a textbook for Modern American Culture 101. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"He also gives readers a poignant mini-memoir about the life of a newspaperman covering the powerful."
Strong language and strong medicine about the decline of the American economy, but marred by overwrought prose and Monday- morning quarterbacking. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1994

What better event than a newspaper strike to show the gulf between the assumptions of the American labor movement and the realities of the information economy? Read full book review >
GONE WHALING by Douglas Hand
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1994

"And when we actually come to see an orca, it is just for one tantalizing moment before we are plunged back into the fairly dull world of whale experts."
Hand's book is less interested in whales than in the humans (including the author) who concern themselves with them. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >