Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 175)

EVIL MONEY by Rachel Ehrenfeld
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1992

Ehrenfeld, a research scholar at NYU Law School and author of Narcoterrorism (1990), ineffectively details several major cases involving money laundering and governmental corruption. Read full book review >
TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY MANAGEMENT by Hesh Kestin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 30, 1992

"An altogether engaging success story, albeit one that could drive management consultants to drink or worse."
From the standpoint of aerodynamic design, there's no way that a bumblebee can keep itself aloft. Read full book review >

THE LAST NEW WORLD by Mac Margolis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 29, 1992

"A compelling account of the relentless incursion into one of the earth's last frontiers, and a determined call for calm and reason amidst the clamor of increasingly belligerent antagonists. (Photographs and maps—not seen.)"
A well-organized, carefully researched, and fascinating study of the devastation of the Amazon rain forest; by Margolis, a Newsweek correspondent for eight years in Brazil. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 25, 1992

"Puette makes clear that the media's negative portrayal has contributed to this state of affairs, but he has little to say about labor's own contribution. (Illustrations throughout.)"
A dissection of media bias against organized labor that makes newspapers' Labor Day editorials about the decline of unions sound like good press. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 17, 1992

"An expert audit of Silicon Valley East, highlighting the contributions of entrepreneurs like Digital Equipment's Ken Olsen and of scholastic promoters like MIT's Vannevar Bush."
A funny thing happened to Lamp and Rosegrant (both former Business Week reporters) on their way to writing a book about the so-called ``Massachusetts Miracle''—a two-decade economic expansion sparked by high-tech enterprises clustered along Route 128, which encircles Boston. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Clear, persuasive, and readable, though incomplete and misleadingly organized."
Here, Axelrod, director of the Public Enterprise Project of the Rockefeller Institute of Government, argues that public authorities (government corporations) have grown to such an extent that they now constitute a ``shadow government'' whose activities are largely beyond electoral control. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Mixing history, anecdote, biography, and poetic description of the battleground: a moving assessment of an ecological dispute with global implications."
A sensitive, intelligent review of the ongoing controversy over the logging of the remaining stands of old-growth forest in western Oregon and Washington; by Dietrich, Pulitzer-winning science writer for The Seattle Times. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"An axe-grinding account of a failed enterprise that deserved, if not a better fate, at least a more accomplished Boswell. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A poorly written, ostentatiously scathing, and utterly dispensable log of an airline's slow-motion crackup. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Still, a thorough assessment of a perilous situation."
Silverman, Lydecker, and Lee—who took upon themselves the seemingly Sisyphean task of exposing the abuses of the pharmaceutical industry (Prescriptions for Death: The Drugging of the Third World, 1982, etc.)—now reexamine the situation in the Third World and conclude that a worldwide crisis exists. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"A full account of Gates and his empire probably awaits someone like Cringely, with a firmer grasp on where PCs are taking the Global Village."
Two Seattle Post-Intelligencer reporters take on—and fumble- -the fascinating tale of how an archetypal nerd built a multibillion-dollar enterprise that sets the standards for PC/work- station software. Read full book review >
MASTERS OF TIME by John Boslough
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"All this is told in an informative, congenial, and nonvindictive style: After all, you never know where the next paradigm will come from."
As befits a National Geographic writer, Boslough literally traveled around the world in the last decade to gather material for this analysis of cosmology today. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Valuable, if solemn, first-person insights on the price of renewal from a professional executive who knows the territory. (Sixteen pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
An insider's earnest report on how Xerox won, lost, and regained control of the multibillion-dollar global market it launched in plain-paper copiers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >