Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 175)

THE CATHOLIC ETHIC AND THE SPIRIT OF CAPITALISM by Michael Novak
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

Close on the heels of Richard John Neuhaus's Doing Well and Doing Good (p. 970) and George Weigel's The Final Revolution (p. 1247): yet another neoconservative study of Catholic teachings on economic freedom and social justice. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"Like a long but intense TV-movie (with even an extraneous love subplot between Keeney and a fellow lawyer thrown in): stock characters and real thrills. (Photos—not seen.)"
The nail-biting tale of a female serial killer and the lawyer who dogged her to justice. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 16, 1993

"A thoughtful and unusually well-written briefing that may prove more useful—and certainly more reinforcing—for small- business people than for Fortune 500 execs."
Forget downsizing, streamlining, and even restructuring: According to business-consultant Farrell, it's time to heave out entire corporate divisions and departments and to spin off what's left into down-and-dirty, turn-on-a-dime, small entrepreneurial ventures. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"The accessible text has charts and graphs throughout (not seen)."
An informed assessment of what's in store for the computer industry now that IBM is no longer showing the way. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"The scrupulously documented text has 16 pages of photos (not seen)."
An illuminating, unsentimental biography of William H. Gates III, youthful cofounder of Microsoft—the multibillion-dollar enterprise that dominates the world of PC software. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Out of this clutch will emerge a memorable few, and Shabecoff's offering, despite its flaws, has the breadth and acuity to be among them."
A wide-ranging and detailed survey of the U.S. environmental tradition from ancient Americans to Al Gore, with cogitations on the squandering, sullying, and disfiguring of our land; by former veteran New York Times correspondent Shabecoff. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A perceptive overview, then, of a consequential clash among the world's economic superpowers."
A journalist's savvy appraisal of how corporate America and Japan, Inc., measure up against a more or less united European Community in the trilateral struggle for economic ascendancy in Europe. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A bleak view of the press by one who's in a position to know."
A trenchant and disturbing analysis of the transformation of newspapers from gatherers of news to profitable corporate assets, by the former editor of the Chicago Tribune. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A thorough evaluation of a capitalist whose often stormy career commands respect and attention. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A Pulitzer-winning journalist's hard-hitting take on Frederick W. Smith, the offbeat entrepreneur who launched and still runs Federal Express. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 26, 1993

More business-oriented advice and cheerleading from Mackay (Beware the Naked Man Who Offers You His Shirt, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"Not a primer in the theory and practice of futures trading, which can be understood only partially by reading between the lines—but full of fascinating historical tidbits lying beneath the promotional blitz."
Forty essays and speeches, many dating back to the 1970's, by the ex-chairman of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME). Read full book review >
KILLING THE SACRED COWS by Ann Crittenden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"A thought-provoking, if scattershot, tract."
A progressive's remedies for perceived ills allegedly created by Reaganomics. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Beatriz Williams
June 23, 2015

In Beatriz Williams’ latest novel Tiny Little Thing, it’s the summer of 1966 and Christina Hardcastle—“Tiny” to her illustrious family—stands on the brink of a breathtaking future. Of the three Schuyler sisters, she’s the one raised to marry a man destined for leadership, and with her elegance and impeccable style, she presents a perfect camera-ready image in the dawning age of television politics. Together she and her husband, Frank, make the ultimate power couple: intelligent, rich, and impossibly attractive. It seems nothing can stop Frank from rising to national office, and he’s got his sights set on a senate seat in November. But as the season gets underway at the family estate on Cape Cod, three unwelcome visitors appear in Tiny’s perfect life. “A fascinating look at wealth, love, ambition, secrets, and what family members will and won’t do to protect each other,” our reviewer writes. View video >