Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 175)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1997

"They also ignore the essential fact that Americans have largely embraced a car culture."
A committed, soft-spoken diatribe against the car culture that romanticizes the alternatives, by the architecture critic for the Nation. Read full book review >
IRONS IN THE FIRE by John McPhee
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1997

"For old hands, more of the unique pleasures you have come to expect."
Nothing, it seems, is beyond McPhee's purview, and these seven essays (which first ran in the New Yorker) offer further evidence that in the right hands even the most prosaic of topics harbors an unsuspected richness of surprising facts and fancies. Read full book review >

THE DREAM ENDURES by Kevin Starr
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1997

"A penetrating addition to an altogether splendid series, which (thanks to the broad appeal of its subject matter and period) could prove a breakout book."
The fifth volume in Starr's grand and wide-ranging history of California (Endangered Dreams, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
THE DECLINE (AND FALL?) OF THE INCOME TAX by Michael J. Graetz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Not the sensationalistic diatribe you expect to see in April, and for that reason well worth reading."
Angry taxpayers may be disappointed that Graetz (Law/Yale) does not jump on the anti-income-tax bandwagon, but they would do well to ponder his reservations about where taxation is headed. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1997

"This strives to be candid and intimate, yet ultimately its commentary fails to break through the commemorative into the kind of real analysis that would have revealed more of the man behind the movement icon. (105 b&w photos, not seen)"
A useful survey and pictorial of the extraordinary career of the visionary Mexican-American labor leader and human-rights activist, who died in his sleep in 1993 at age 66. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 25, 1997

"But not everyone will buy into their communal vision of justice, which will remain anathema to unreconstructed rugged American individualists."
Responding to the current wave of affirmative-action backlash, two Georgetown law professors, each proud beneficiaries of the policy, stand as zealous advocates brooking no retreat. ``Our parents taught us that . . . the struggle to make a place at the table for ourselves was also the struggle to free the souls of those who would exclude us,'' write Lawrence (who is African-American) and Matsuda (Japanese-American) of their individual family legacies of political idealism and civil rights activism. Read full book review >
BIRDS OF PREY by Matthew Lynn
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 24, 1997

"While Lynn, a staffer at the Sunday Times of London, writes serviceable prose at best, this is a workmanlike briefing on a consequential clash affecting the latter-day wealth of nations."
A British journalist's matter-of-fact take on how a state- subsidized European consortium has managed to narrow the long lead once held by American manufacturers in the high-stakes competition to equip the world's airlines with jet planes. Read full book review >
BREAKING UP AMERICA by Joseph Turow
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1997

"An intriguing book if you ignore its dramatic, somewhat unsubstantiated premise."
Here's the argument from media expert Turow (Annenberg School of Communications/Univ. of Penn.): The current price of targeting advertising to highly defined market segments is dividing the country into increasingly insular groups of people who care only about others like themselves. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 19, 1997

"Ditto for other cities contemplating the construction of a new stadium."
This dense and sometimes difficult financial analysis leads to easily understood and sensible conclusions about the business of sports. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 13, 1997

"For those seeking to understand the national debt, this book is a good place to start—it's just not a good place to stop."
American Heritage columnist Gordon (The Scarlet Woman of Wall Street, 1988) deserves credit for attempting a brief history of the national debt aimed at a wide audience, but the result is somewhat disappointing. Read full book review >
BACK FROM THE BRINK by Steven K. Beckner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 1997

"No doubt Alan Greenspan will be one of the most appreciative of those readers."
A detailed and sometimes fawning account of Alan Greenspan's chairmanship of the Federal Reserve Board. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"An entertaining, on-the-money introduction to precisely what makes the world go 'round. (Author tour)"
An engagingly digressive audit of the mediums of exchange humankind has used and abused down through the years, from anthropologist Weatherford (Savages and Civilization, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >