Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 175)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Relationships based on sex are bound to fail if we're bent on conquering the object of our love''), Rechtschaffen's facile, often preachy style reduces his truths to truisms. (First serial to New Woman magazine; Literary Guild Selection; author tour)"
Yet another book teaching busy Americans how to slow down and savor the moment. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 23, 1996

"Although Randall opens the door to understanding the significant relationships women have with money, she fails to cross the threshold into serious analysis."
Randall, a writer, photographer, and political activist, gambles big by attempting to tackle such an inherently complex topic as money. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 23, 1996

"Students of the media will want to have a good look at this deconstruction of the headlines."
A spirited reading of the daily papers, with an eye to uncovering the cultural and political forces that shape the news. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 6, 1996

"It's hard to know who will have the last laugh with this one."
When this was first published in 1967, Kirkus's reviewer wrote, ``If it is a fraud, it is a clever one . . . if not, it is a chilling case for the necessity of war as policymakers see it . . . and will provide magnificent fodder for radicals et al.'' Well, this controversial volume did turn out to be a fraud (Lewin's fellow hoaxster Victor Navasky, in his introduction, prefers to call it a satire), and it did provide fodder for radicals—not radicals of the left, as expected, but radicals of the right. Read full book review >
AMAZON STRANGER by Mike Tidwell
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 6, 1996

"A tale with enough punch to turn a few heads and enough storytelling talent to keep the converted charmed. (First serial to Reader's Digest)"
From deep in the Ecuadoran rainforest, from the heart of the Cof†n Indian lands, comes Tidwell's (In the Shadow of the White House, 1992, etc.) spirited firsthand report on the indigenous peoples' struggle to survive. Read full book review >

A RIVER LOST by Blaine Harden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Although much of the story has already been written elsewhere, Harden's bold and well-supported commentary is a welcome addition to the literature of this majestic river. (maps, not seen)"
Joining the recent stream of books on the Columbia River is this hard-hitting report on the policies that have governed this most engineered of all American rivers. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"A welcome if offbeat contribution to corporate literature, one that examines the communitarian possibilities of large multinational organizations rather than their presumptive failings and deficiencies."
A slick, selective, and provocative history of postWW II management from a New Age missionary who makes no secret of his commitment to the arguable notion that corporations exist to change the world—for the better. Read full book review >
THE CIGARETTE PAPERS by Stanton A. Glantz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Difficult as it is to work one's way through this book, the labor yields disclosures of the sort that doubtless makes for an industry insider's worst nightmare—revelations that will add new fuel to the widening debate about smoking."
An eye-opening exposÇ of the workings of the tobacco industry, based on the leaked internal documents of a leading cigarette company. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Upbeat, positive messages suggesting that the similarities in Americans' lives outweigh the differences—perfect for an election year. (Author tour)"
A collection of inspirational correspondence from parents, grandparents, mentors, and friends aimed at guiding a younger generation along the road to fulfillment. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"A genuinely amazing story and an interesting read in an age when aid to the poor is demonized."
A welcome and readable account of the effort of a unique bank in Bangladesh to help that country's poor. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 28, 1996

"Put this in your pipe and prepare for a richly rewarding read."
In this sturdy if sometimes long-winded account of tobacco in America, high-toned moralizing on the plight of the ``millions enslaved by nicotine'' accompanies level-headed analysis of the evils of cigarettes. Read full book review >
THE GOOD SOCIETY by John Kenneth Galbraith
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 26, 1996

"An elder eminence's meagerly substantiated but righteously framed prescriptions for creating collective heavens on earth."
Always more of a critic than a scholar, Galbraith (The Culture of Contentment, 1992, etc.) here offers an exiguous primer on what, in his unabashedly partisan view, would constitute an attainably good society. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >