Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 176)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 3, 1995

"A convincingly documented and thought-provoking audit of the high costs of government intervention in the free markets that have built America's enviably high standard of living. ($40,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A contrarian view of the much-maligned 1980s, from a University of Chicago economist who remains convinced that the US government was guilty of economic offenses far worse than any committed by the handful of putatively errant Wall Streeters it put in the dock. Read full book review >
SERPENT ON THE ROCK by Kurt Eichenwald
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 2, 1995

"A masterful reconstruction of a substantive financial scandal, one that bears comparison with such landmark exposÇs as Barbarians at the Gate, Den of Thieves, and The Predators' Ball. (8 pages photos, not seen) ($100,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
An absorbing and definitive take on the criminally unscrupulous deceptions committed by Prudential Securities in its aggressive marketing of chancy limited partnerships during the 1980s. Read full book review >

LEADING MINDS by Howard Gardner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 2, 1995

"With its reverence toward leadership, this celebratory book will be useful for seminars and conferences for aspiring leaders. (photos, not seen)"
A leading psychologist deploys his theories of perception and creativity to explain the success of prominent 20th-century leaders. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Stories both unique and universal, notable for illuminating the gremlins of thought and feeling that drive most lives."
Three women at moments of crisis in their lives, captured in empathetic and revealing portraits. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"It's not fast-food reading; it's serious food for thought."
Political scientist Barber (Rutgers; An Aristocracy of Everyone, 1992, etc.) grandly divides the planet into no more and no less than two camps to explain the present universal, sorry mess. Read full book review >

EXECUTIVE BLUES by G.J. Meyer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Here's a funny, frank, and underlying it all, melancholy journal of a painful journey. (First serial to Harper's)"
Corporate flack Meyer (The Memphis Murders, not reviewed) tells his own story, from rags to riches to outplacement hell. Read full book review >
THE MAKING OF A CONSERVATIVE ENVIRONMENTALIST by Gordon K. Durnil
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Uncommonly sensible and heartfelt perspectives on being green, from a concerned citizen for whom environmentalism has become a matter of enlightened self-interest."
An engaging and thought-provoking memoir from a political conservative whose environmental consciousness was raised during a stint as co-head of a watchdog agency. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"An uninformed and uninformative take on a pillar of the sweet- tooth trade. (photos, not seen) (First printing of 40,000; author tour)"
This trashy, overstated assault on the proprietors of Mars Inc. Read full book review >
BEHIND THE WHEEL AT CHRYSLER by Doron P. Levin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 17, 1995

"A cogent exposition that provides an understanding of who and what propels the monster auto industry through its exhilarating booms and dolorous slumps."
Detroit Free Press reporter Levin (Irreconcilable Differences: Ross Perot vs. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 10, 1995

"8 pages b&w photos, not seen)."
A fulsome life story of an evangelistic lecturer, a champion of Babbittry, and author of the prototypical self-helper, the late Professor Napoleon Hill, is offered by an interested party. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1995

"The Tsutsumis await a savvier Boswell to bring them to life."
British journalist Downer has bitten off appreciably more than she can chew in this interpretive history of the house of Tsutsumi, one of the wealthiest and least conventional families in conformist Japan. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1995

"You get the feeling the authors don't watch kids who watch TV, but their eloquent defense of public television comes at a crucial time."
A rousing if slightly canned diatribe against commercial children's television, by a former FCC chairman and broadcasting executive. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >