Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 176)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Interesting profiles, ho-hum analysis."
A by-now familiar study of accomplished, powerful women and their inability to combine high-octane careers with motherhood in the existing corporate culture. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"A readable, provocative treatise that 'gets outside the box' in a huge way. Timely and inspiring."
Noted eco-designers suggest a paradigm shift in human habits of manufacture and consumption. Read full book review >

A WORKING STIFF’S MANIFESTO by Iain Levison
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Amusing but punch-less."
A raucous memoir of odd jobs and unhappiness by an author who is more drifter than working stiff. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"An urgent and cogent (if somewhat breathless) reminder that journalistic ethics must attempt to keep pace with the explosive technological revolution."
Seib (Campaigns and Conscience, not reviewed) examines the professional, commercial, and ethical pressures on the news media exerted by technologies that make the delivery of information both instantaneous and global. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A sharp and fascinating account."
Kerr (Lost Japan, not reviewed), one of the West's most astute observers of the Japanese scene, unveils a cultural crisis of mega-proportions that currently grips the island nation like a vise. Read full book review >

FRIEDRICH HAYEK by Alan Ebenstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

"A solid and serviceable, if somewhat dry, introduction to Hayek's life and work."
An intellectual biography of one of the 20th century's greatest economists. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"Readers who expect a repeat of the author's lively intellectual romp through WWI are in for a jolt. Packed with charts, graphs, and scholarly economic analysis, this is much heavier going—but those who persist will find a stimulating, well-documented outpouring of controversial ideas."
Does money make the world go round? While conventional wisdom maintains that economics drives all political change from wars to elections to industrial progress, the author casts a skeptical eye. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"For the academic shopaholic."
A frequently muddled, occasionally intriguing exploration of shoppers and shops from the 19th to the 21st centuries. Read full book review >
MOTHER JONES by Elliott J. Gorn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

"Amid the current concerns over global labor exploitation, this is a timely, unromanticized reminder that human suffering has accompanied industrial change in the past, and that people fought to ameliorate it."
A stimulating biography of the pugnacious labor organizer that sheds light on radical movements while questioning the myth-making machine that surrounds great figures. Read full book review >
THE SHORT SWEET DREAM OF EDUARDO GUTIÉRREZ by Jimmy Breslin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

"A straightforward account of an illegal that comments eloquently on the human cost of globalization."
Legendary newspaper columnist and novelist (I Don't Want to Go to Jail, p. 347, etc.) Breslin's revealing and tragic saga of an illegal Mexican worker who perished in a 1999 New York City construction accident. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 15, 2001

"Sowell's economics in a social vacuum is as meaningful as color in the absence of light."
From conservative think-tanker Sowell (The Quest for Cosmic Justice, 1999, etc.), ideological balderdash parading as a disinterested introduction to economics. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 2001

"The dismal science is no longer quite so dismal with the arrival of this wonderfully instructive report."
A smart reporter with an instinctive tilt to the left, Garson (All the Livelong Day, not reviewed, etc.) follows her money around the world in this perceptive financial odyssey. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >