Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Helpful tabular material and graphs throughout."
An accessible audit of Russia's efforts to gain a place at global capitalism's table after more than seven decades of Communist misrule and mismanagement. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"You'll want to avert your eyes as Kunen recreates the accident in all its blood and tears, but hang on for some impressive corporate muckraking. (8 pages of b&w photos, not seen)"
Part tabloid-style tearjerker, part sophisticated corporate exposÇ, by a former People magazine crime writer and bestselling author (The Strawberry Statement, 1969). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"In this case, it seems, he's a better salesman than author. (First serial to Harper's)"
A turgid, self-indulgent treatment of a rich topic: how ``selling has achieved dominion over the world in our time.'' Shorris (Latinos, 1992) long combined life as a writer with a top position at the N.W. Ayer advertising agency. ``I needed the job,'' he confesses. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

Freelance journalist Shear arrestingly reconstructs a notably bad bargain the US struck with Japan during a period when, despite an immense trade deficit, Washington was willing to pay almost any price to keep the island nation on its side in the Cold War. Read full book review >

INSIDE THE STRIKE ZONE by Randal Hendricks
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Tenaciously dull writing, but essential for anyone wishing to understand the business of baseball and how it got that way."
A labored, slanted, but worthwhile discussion of the often bizarre financial dealings of baseball, by a major player in the evolution of free agency and escalating salaries. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Mainly for students and policy wonks."
A pointed reinterpretation of the history of antipoverty policy, arguing that racism most explains why our welfare state is feeble compared with other industrialized nations. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"He also gives readers a poignant mini-memoir about the life of a newspaperman covering the powerful."
Strong language and strong medicine about the decline of the American economy, but marred by overwrought prose and Monday- morning quarterbacking. Read full book review >
McLIBEL by John Vidal
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"If the case itself hasn't already given Ronald McDonald indigestion, this book might. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A lively account of the food fight that became the longest trial in British history. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A clear, angry, important (though interim) work that treats significant matters with clarity and intelligence. (8 pages photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A journalist for Toronto's Globe and Mail details the continuing, wretched story of Swiss collusion, as financiers and dealers in stolen goods, with Nazi Germany. Read full book review >
BLUEPRINT FOR A NEW JAPAN by Ichiro Ozawa
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 12, 1994

"For certain, however, his grand design is in the self-interested tradition of an insular nation-state whose capacity to adapt has not been in serious doubt since the Meiji Restoration. (Maps)"
A master plan for an institutional makeover of Japan from a political insider whose revisionist agenda remains firmly rooted in the ruling class's long-standing preoccupation with national security. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 31, 1994

"Kaufman comes across as a blend of science fetishist, free- market wonk, and immense sour grape—his good points sadly lost in the blather."
In classic jilted-lover style, former environmental activist Kaufman (The Beaches Are Moving, 1979) levels some sharp and deserving criticisms at the environmental movement, but loses credibility when he just can't find one good word for his former partner. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >