Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

THE SOCIAL MEANING OF MONEY by Viviana A. Zelizer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 22, 1994

"An illuminating, on-the-money audit of a protean commodity that's largely taken for granted."
A scholar's thought-provoking and persuasively documented challenge to the utilitarian assumption that money is simply a fungible, impersonal medium of exchange. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 8, 1994

An absorbing account of how Kentucky's Calumet Farm, long thoroughbred racing's paramount breeding stable, came a cropper in the 1990s. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1994

"Galbraith still writes better than any of his colleagues, but this material is more suitable to an after-dinner speech before a mellow and pleasantly partisan audience."
From Galbraith, now 85 and professor emeritus at Harvard, a personal, idiosyncratic, and thin history of the economics of the century. Read full book review >
JUST DO IT by Donald Katz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1994

"An engrossing and illuminating appreciation of a distinctive corporate culture."
An agreeably fervid take on what makes Nike Inc. a consistent winner in the ultracompetitive sports-and-fitness trade. Read full book review >
BEN AND JERRY'S by Fred Lager
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"A diverting take on a flourishing concern that, if not precisely a commercial paradigm, does its own thing with considerable style and gusto. (Author tour)"
An insider's engagingly informal history of Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc., a Vermont-based enterprise known for its scrumptious ice cream, profitable growth, and idiosyncratic brand of socioeconomic responsibility. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 25, 1994

"A compelling addition to the ongoing conservation debate, with new ideas on how we might stop trashing the earth."
A brilliantly informed look at one of the most pressing problems of the '90s—the waste crisis—by an economic development expert (How Can Africa Survive?, not reviewed). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 18, 1994

An arresting albeit donnish, reappraisal of the forces driving the global economy, from a man of the left who minces few words about his progressive agenda. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 15, 1994

"For all its colorful coinages, an essentially conventional, cut-and-paste guide that won't tell management professionals a whole lot they don't already know."
Give consultant Albrecht credit for an arresting metaphor, but not much else, in his latest excursion into the well-trodden bourns of organizational theory and practice. Read full book review >
SNAPSHOTS FROM HELL by Peter Robinson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 14, 1994

"Not the ultimate B-school survival guide, but a genial description of everything about getting an MBA that you wanted to know but were afraid to find out. (Author tour)"
A funny and frenetic account of Robinson's crucial first year in Stanford's MBA program, offering an education in itself as well as a cautionary tale. Read full book review >
THE FORCE by David Dorsey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 18, 1994

"Dorsey. (First serial to Esquire; Fortune Book Club selection)"
Freelance journalist Dorsey offers an unsparingly detailed account of a year-long span in the professional lives of a four- man/three-woman group of high-caste hucksters who work out of Xerox Corp.'s district office in Cleveland. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 18, 1994

"Accessible, down-to-earth guidance on a demanding oversight philosophy that, for all its recuperative powers, promises the commercially challenged neither quick fixes nor instant salvation."
A journalist's objective and informative report on total quality management (TQM) in the US over the past 15 years. Read full book review >
CERTAIN TRUMPETS by Garry Wills
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 9, 1994

"1980s."
Wills (History/Northwestern) has written a stunningly literate and thoughtful examination of what makes a leader. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >