Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 8, 1996

"A fine contribution to Amazonian studies and to the literature of environmental advocacy. (90 color photos, 3 b&w photos, 2 maps)"
A comprehensive overview of the Amazon Basin's riparian ecology and of the economic development that threatens to destroy it. ``As the new century approaches,'' the authors write, ``the Amazon is being transformed by deforestation, urban growth, mining, dams, and widespread exploitation of its natural resources.'' Yet in world coverage of these events, they maintain, the Amazon serves as a backdrop; they offer the astonishing fact that more is known about the Amazon as a whole than about a handful of its tributaries, thanks to a lack of thoroughgoing ecological investigations of the entire region. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 20, 1996

"If the Republican Revolution does indeed stall, Dionne's convincing and acute analysis will have predicted it. (Author tour)"
Washington Post columnist Dionne (Why Americans Hate Politics, 1991) turns his attention to the so-called Republican realignment of the 1994 elections and reaches a surprising conclusion. ``The new radicalism in American politics means that the debate in 1996 and beyond is not simply a contest between political parties,'' Dionne writes, ``It is a confrontation between fundamentally different approaches to economic turbulence, moral uncertainty and international disorder.'' Dionne argues convincingly that there is actually ample precedent for the upheavals affecting the American political scene today; he draws striking parallels with the last third of the 19th century and the rise of the Progressive movement. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Perceptive perspectives on what tomorrow might hold for the family of man and its commercial enterprises. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selections; $100,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
An investment banker's sophisticated audit of the geopolitical and socioeconomic forces that could shape the postmillennial world. Read full book review >
THE SEASONS OF A WOMAN'S LIFE by Daniel J. Levinson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 26, 1996

"Probably too little too late, but read it for the stimulating early and ending chapters, which argue convincingly that the tumultuous eras marking the decades from 20 to 50 are part of a struggle to maturity that men and women share. (First printing of 30,000)"
Interpretations of women's life histories support the hypothesis that the road through adulthood is a series of developmental construction zones, relieved only rarely by a measured mile of achievement-related superhighway. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"At least it will succeed in making alumni wonder what's going on at alma mater."
The author, who has doctorates in education and social work, argues that intellectual standards in American universities have deteriorated to the point of crisis. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 15, 1995

"Mildly entertaining, but not likely to add Chapman to the ambiguous pantheon of American crime. (8 pages b&w photos)"
Prolific true-crime and mystery writer Jeffers (A Grand Night for Murder, 1995, etc.) details a neglected chapter in American criminal history—but a chapter may be all the story merits. Read full book review >
THE DEATH OF ECONOMICS by Paul Ormerod
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 15, 1995

"An effective indictment of (rather than an obituary for) a branch of learning that's overdue for renewal."
An old Wall Street adage holds that if all the world's economists were laid end to end, they would never reach a conclusion. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 5, 1996

"Like advertising's favorite medium, TV, Adcult rivets attention powerfully, even brilliantly, but edifies little. (181 illustrations, not seen) (Author tour)"
A virtuosic survey of advertising in America, this book is a romp through the land where you (and your wallet) are the most desirable, sought-after creature in the world. Read full book review >
URBAN ODYSSEY by Francine Curro Cary
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Formulaic and bland—a not very successful effort to examine one side of the life of this very troubled and divided city. (69 b&w photos, 6 line drawings, not seen)"
A series of essays designed to show that Washington, D.C., is more than a city of mostly white male transients who shuttle weekly between sound bites on Capitol Hill and chicken dinners with their far-flung constituencies. Read full book review >
STEINWAY AND SONS by Richard K. Lieberman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"A tidy package for those who want the facts, plus a bit more, on merchant music makers overtaken by events and their own inability to adapt. (70 photos and illustrations, not seen)"
If D.W. Fostle produced a lush Mahler symphony in recounting the rise and fall of the first family of pianos (The Steinway Saga, p. 356), Lieberman, using the same theme of an American dynasty's seasons in the sun, has created a more compact and disciplined concerto for piano and orchestra. Read full book review >
THE LIFE OF ADAM SMITH by Ian Simpson Ross
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"With a minimum of pedantic intrusions, Ross makes a masterly job not only of putting Smith in the context of his turbulent times, but also of shedding light on his humane subject's wide- ranging contributions to Western thought. (20 halftones, not seen)"
A principal virtue of this scholarly but animated and accessible biography of the Scottish polymath Adam Smith is that it puts paid to any notion Smith was either a single-issue crusader or an ivory-tower intellectual. Read full book review >
ENDANGERED DREAMS by Kevin Starr
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Complete with anecdotal particulars and big-picture perspectives, a stunningly effective chronicle of a vanguard state's coming of age. (25 halftones, not seen)"
A first-rate, vivid, verbal diorama of the varied events that formed and reformed California during the convulsive decade before WW II, from the state's librarian and author of Inventing the Dream (1985, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >