Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

BORNEO LOG by William W. Bevis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"An absorbing, well-documented work that is of extreme and immediate relevance to both Third and First World peoples. (8 illustrations and maps, not seen)"
In a riveting account both beautiful and shocking, Bevis (English/Univ. of Montana) travels upriver in Borneo to witness the destruction of the world's oldest rain forests and one of the world's oldest cultures. Read full book review >
WHEN CORPORATIONS RULE THE WORLD by David C. Korten
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A communitarian tract longer on anticorporate bias than constructive proposals as to how a new age might be ushered in."
In this quixotic manifesto, development consultant Korten (founder of a Manhattan-based organization called the People- Centered Development Forum) has rather a lot to say against multinational corporations and for empowered communities sustaining themselves with traditional values and the judicious use of local resources. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 19, 1995

"Call it messianic or ballsy, there's a courage to this interviewee that makes for both an educational and entertaining read, though one dampened by the constraints of the question-and- answer format. (First serial to Fortune Magazine; $250,000 ad/promo)"
This penetrating interview with dominant financial philosopher and philanthropist Soros (Underwriting Democracy, 1991, etc.) is unfortunately hindered by repetition, obscurity, and occasionally forced contrariness. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"No heavy lifting required."
Professional longshoreman and itinerant fruit picker Theriault punches in with a perspective that has been out of fashion lately: that of the worker who, he demonstrates, is entitled to some respect. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"This is an important and accessible contribution to recent forest-ecology literature, and required reading for all federal and state officials. (25 illustrations, 3 figures, 4 maps)"
As presented by Langston (Environmental Studies/Univ. of Wisconsin), it is no idle metaphor to state that federal forest managers could not see the forest for the trees in pursuit of an efficient means of harvesting timber in Oregon's Blue Mountains. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"On the whole, however, he provides a clear briefing on a financial fiasco whose consequences could prove earthshaking for insurers and insured alike. (12-page photo insert)"
An intelligible and generally absorbing rundown on how one of the world's best known but least understood financial institutions came to possibly terminal grief. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A credible worst-case evaluation of what slower economic growth has and could cost the American polity if the nation fails to regain its historic momentum."
Madrick looks into the vast vessel that is the US economy and pronounces it half emptyand draining. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"And once again Brockway poses that challenging and provocative question: Why don't they?"
Brockway (The End of Economic Man, 1991, etc.) provides here a selection from ten years of musings on ``The Dismal Science'' from his monthly column for The New Leader. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 28, 1997

"Valuable support for anyone who instinctively rejects Nostradamus."
A series of acute essays on the strange pseudoscience of predicting the future. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"As complete a story on a consequential financial institution and intermediary as is likely to be had this side of the corporate archives. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A revealing take on the secretive family firm that manages over $400 billion of the world's money and throws its weight around in capital markets. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 20, 1995

"An impressive amassing of case histories, both horrifying and inspirational, resulting in a book that's breezy, sanctimonious, and dull. (Author tour)"
Reason Foundation fellows Eggers and O'Leary argue that government should be downsized and its energies redirected. ``Beyond the Beltway, in the towns, cities, and states of America . . .'' Here we go again. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 18, 1995

"This low-key appreciation of America's emergence as an economic superpower lacks the interpretive fortitude that makes for telling judgments."
An old Wall Street jape holds that if all the world's economists were laid end to end, they would never reach a conclusion. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >