Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"While Sullivan is right to decry the gap in the current literature on Japan, he fails to stake out new territory here."
From Sullivan (Univ. of Washington Business School): a study that's part exploration of the role of Japanese corporations in American life, part critique of the current US-Japan dialogue, part how-to for Americans working for Japanese managers—and far too meandering and diffuse to offer a proper treatment of its many subjects. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 16, 1997

"If Chernow provides no breakthrough perspectives to arrest the attention of professionals, he delivers a sound, accessible account of the forces shaping capital, credit, currency, and securities markets on the eve of a new millennium."
Three ad rem essays from National Book Award winner Chernow on the convulsive shift in the balance of monetary power (from commercial, investment, and merchant bankers to financial conglomerates) that has marked 20th-century capitalism. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 2, 1994

"The goal, presumably, is to enable legions of suited workers to imagine that they're really armored Lancelots, that their workstations are noble mounts, and that the business of making a living—or a widget, or an arrow—is just as heroic as the deeds of Arthurian legend."
Byham and Cox (Zapp!, not reviewed) tell a facile fable about dragon-slaying in order to spread yet another business gospel about quality, teamwork, and empowerment. Read full book review >
REAL MAGIC by Wayne W. Dyer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 3, 1992

"Dyer's strength is in popularizing these thinkers and their ideas for the mainstream; his weakness is in a certain whiff of infatuation with his own celebrity that now and then wafts up from his pages."
Dyer (You'll See It When You Believe It, 1989, etc.) recaps the major tenets of New Age thinking—power meditation, unified field theory, mind-body healing, and prosperity consciousness, to name a few. ``Real magic,'' according to Dyer, is the seemingly miraculous response of the environment to a unity of purpose and belief in the individual. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"An evenhanded introduction to as unlovable and consequential a crew as ever pounded a boardroom's conference table."
A blue-chip rundown on the predatory Wall Streeters who incur sizable risks in hope of realizing handsome rewards—by taking big positions at a discount in the distressed debt securities of Chapter 11 casualties. Read full book review >

KILLING THE SACRED COWS by Ann Crittenden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"A thought-provoking, if scattershot, tract."
A progressive's remedies for perceived ills allegedly created by Reaganomics. Read full book review >
MANAGING AT THE SPEED OF CHANGE by Daryl R. Conner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A schematic diagram that will prove both useful and reassuring but that fails to address the layperson's most basic question about change: Why must it happen at all?"
``Change doctor'' and corporate-crisis intervener Conner explains why some managers instinctively thrive on change while others founder and fail, and how the latter can learn to be more like the former. Read full book review >
HIGHWAYS TO HEAVEN by Christopher Finch
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 15, 1992

"A bracing tour through 20th-century American culture. (One hundred b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Cultural historian Finch (co-author, Gone Hollywood, 1979; Rainbow, 1975) deftly examines Americans' auto eroticism and the revolutionary alterations it has made in the country's landscape. Read full book review >
EVIL MONEY by Rachel Ehrenfeld
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1992

Ehrenfeld, a research scholar at NYU Law School and author of Narcoterrorism (1990), ineffectively details several major cases involving money laundering and governmental corruption. Read full book review >
VICTORY SECRETS OF ATTILA THE HUN by Wess Roberts
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 6, 1993

"A decidedly different sort of management guide—and one whose purposefully perverse protagonist still commands serious attention."
A welcome return for one of publishing's more implausible—and popular—paradigms (Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun, 1989), giving Roberts (Straight A`s Never Made Anybody Rich, 1991) a chance to offer crafty counsel on what it takes to create and run a prospering enterprise. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"20, but the authors' prose and prescriptions are far from clear, marred by bad grammar, jargon, and patches of supreme self-evidence. (Five line illustrations.)"
American business schools fail to produce savvy international corporate managers because the schools' philosophical and technical biases are narrow, Cartesian-based, and one-dimensional—and so don't provide the tools to master increasingly complex marketing and production problems. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A truly original thesis that, unfortunately, has a ragged seam down the middle."
When Paepke, a lawyer and former research chemist, refers to ``human transformation'' in this fascinating though somewhat uneven exploration of our economic future, he doesn't mean the human- potential movement. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >