Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

FISHCAMP by Nancy Lord
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 10, 1997

"Lord creates an elegant, evocative portrait of a hard, beautiful place."
In describing her salmon-fishing life along Alaska's Cook Inlet, fiction writer Lord (Survival, 1991) fashions a rich, personal cosmology in prose as fluid as her environment. Read full book review >
THE DECLINE (AND FALL?) OF THE INCOME TAX by Michael J. Graetz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Not the sensationalistic diatribe you expect to see in April, and for that reason well worth reading."
Angry taxpayers may be disappointed that Graetz (Law/Yale) does not jump on the anti-income-tax bandwagon, but they would do well to ponder his reservations about where taxation is headed. Read full book review >

THE MONEY CULTURE by Michael Lewis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"On the whole, however, the compilation sets a very high standard and provides an evocative, if not precisely nostalgic, record of the recent past's megabuck madnesses."
With this collection of 30-odd pieces (all previously published in a half-dozen magazine and newspapers), Lewis (Liar's Poker, 1989) stakes a further claim to being the wittiest critic of private enterprise since the pseudonymous ``Adam Smith'' was plying his merry trade during the go-go 1960's. Read full book review >
REFLECTIONS OF AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION BABY by Stephen L. Carter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 11, 1991

"Americans seems to overlook the harsh historical reality and pervasive attitudes that made affirmative action a necessity."
Affirmative-action programs have ``run their course'' and, according to this overworked, self-referential diatribe from Carter (Yale/Law), that's all to the good. Read full book review >
MANAGING FROM THE HEART by Hyler Bracey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 9, 1991

"Awesomely smug claptrap whose teachings amount to little more than trendy restatements of the golden rule."
If the four SNAGs (sensitive New Age guys) responsible for this pretentious bosh had not included a closing pitch for their Atlanta-based consultancy, many readers might conclude they were lampooning the caring/sharing subgenre of management guides. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 9, 1991

"Entertaining and elegant—perhaps not everyone's cup of tea, but boasting far more flavor than the average travel book."
An engaging and offbeat exploration of the tea trade by English travel-writer Goodwin, whose two grandmothers—Granny Eileen with her tea caddy from India, filled with Keemun and Lapsang Souchong; Granny Goodwin with her tea caddy from China, filled with Assam and Darjeeling—gave him an early introduction to the ritual and romance of tea. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Thought-provoking perspectives on the market and life as tests that never end."
A veteran Wall Streeter, Mamis argued for technical (as opposed to fundamental) analysis of stock prices in When to Sell (1977) and How to Buy (1982). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 27, 1991

"An ingenuous but utterly unpersuasive exercise that uses neoclassical economic theory as a stalking horse for greater egalitarianism in the US workplace and marketplace."
A Panglossian pitch for the dubious proposition that Japan's so-called humanistic capitalism sets a classic example for Western industrial powers. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 14, 1991

"A bonus is the extraordinary insight into why children and adults seem to resist learning and why they often behave in such mystifying ways."
A convincing call to reexamine the way children learn in their earliest years, and to make use of those new findings in classrooms. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"In tight, lean prose, Hofvendahl writes evocatively of courage, hope, and the essential decency of ordinary people: in all, a gritty picture of desperate Depression days when uncounted thousands left home to seek a more hopeful life somewhere beyond the horizon."
Absorbing sequel to Hofvendahl's Hard on the Wind (1983), which detailed the author's sea-faring adventures at age 15. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 1991

"A conjectural scenario that's as closely reasoned as it is deeply disturbing."
Tough-minded socioeconomic forecasts that, while in the alarmist tradition of Ravi Batra, Harry Browne, Adrian Day, etc, afford genuinely thoughtful perspectives on an arguably uncertain future. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"For the most part, however, a muddled miscellany. (Eight pages of b&w photos— not seen.)"
A scattershot profile of a wily septuagenarian who seems to have succeeded the late Armand Hammer as the Kremlin's favorite US businessman. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >