Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 178)

AMAZON STRANGER by Mike Tidwell
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 6, 1996

"A tale with enough punch to turn a few heads and enough storytelling talent to keep the converted charmed. (First serial to Reader's Digest)"
From deep in the Ecuadoran rainforest, from the heart of the Cof†n Indian lands, comes Tidwell's (In the Shadow of the White House, 1992, etc.) spirited firsthand report on the indigenous peoples' struggle to survive. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"A genuinely amazing story and an interesting read in an age when aid to the poor is demonized."
A welcome and readable account of the effort of a unique bank in Bangladesh to help that country's poor. Read full book review >

A RIVER LOST by Blaine Harden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Although much of the story has already been written elsewhere, Harden's bold and well-supported commentary is a welcome addition to the literature of this majestic river. (maps, not seen)"
Joining the recent stream of books on the Columbia River is this hard-hitting report on the policies that have governed this most engineered of all American rivers. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"A welcome if offbeat contribution to corporate literature, one that examines the communitarian possibilities of large multinational organizations rather than their presumptive failings and deficiencies."
A slick, selective, and provocative history of postWW II management from a New Age missionary who makes no secret of his commitment to the arguable notion that corporations exist to change the world—for the better. Read full book review >
THE CIGARETTE PAPERS by Stanton A. Glantz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Difficult as it is to work one's way through this book, the labor yields disclosures of the sort that doubtless makes for an industry insider's worst nightmare—revelations that will add new fuel to the widening debate about smoking."
An eye-opening exposÇ of the workings of the tobacco industry, based on the leaked internal documents of a leading cigarette company. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Upbeat, positive messages suggesting that the similarities in Americans' lives outweigh the differences—perfect for an election year. (Author tour)"
A collection of inspirational correspondence from parents, grandparents, mentors, and friends aimed at guiding a younger generation along the road to fulfillment. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 17, 1996

"Mexico watchers expect hard times to come for that country, and Oppenheimer's excellent book explains just why."
NAFTA, Zapatista guerrillas, and Wall Street form the backdrop for this fine journalistic account of Mexico's current tumult. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 24, 1996

"The trend is everything: Just pick one and ride it until you feel yourself click into place. (First printing of 150,000)"
Popcorn's ``click'' has nothing to do with either feminist consciousness or the PC mouse. Read full book review >
DIVIDED PLANET by Tom Athanasiou
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 22, 1996

"Few people hold that the world's environment is not in trouble, and Athanasiou does not help his cause with this querulous, obvious book."
A shrill indictment of all that is wrong with the current environmental movement. ``Environmentalism,'' political activist Athanasiou writes, ``is only now reaching its political maturity. Read full book review >
HANDS OFF by Susan Lee
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 15, 1996

"An informative primer with an attitude."
A laissez-faire economist's back-to-basics restatement of the case against Washington's active involvement in commercial affairs. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 15, 1996

"At a time when the last vestiges of Great Society federalism are under siege in Congress, this well-written study commands particular interest. (Author tour)"
When you next put on a seat belt, visit a national seashore, or switch to NPR, think of the Great Society, says Pulitzer Prizewinning historian Unger (New York Univ.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 6, 1996

"It's hard to know who will have the last laugh with this one."
When this was first published in 1967, Kirkus's reviewer wrote, ``If it is a fraud, it is a clever one . . . if not, it is a chilling case for the necessity of war as policymakers see it . . . and will provide magnificent fodder for radicals et al.'' Well, this controversial volume did turn out to be a fraud (Lewin's fellow hoaxster Victor Navasky, in his introduction, prefers to call it a satire), and it did provide fodder for radicals—not radicals of the left, as expected, but radicals of the right. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >