Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 2)

THE POLITICIANS AND THE EGALITARIANS by Sean Wilentz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 11, 2016

"A master scholar delivers a delightfully stimulating historical polemic."
A stern, thoroughly satisfying harangue on the realities of politics in the United States by the veteran, prizewinning historian. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 10, 2016

"An astute, painstakingly documented introduction to anticipatory governance written with thoroughness and expertise."
A debut book offers an ambitious examination of a new approach to the formulation of policy regarding science. Read full book review >

GRIT by Angela Duckworth
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Not your grandpa's self-help book, but Duckworth's text is oddly encouraging, exhorting us to do better by trying harder, and a pleasure to read."
Gumption: it's not just for readers of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, as this debut book, blending anecdote and science, statistic and yarn, capably illustrates.Read full book review >
Cynicism by Andrew Stevenson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 25, 2016

"An entertaining, cynical critique of cynicism, mostly worth reading for its comedy and brevity."
A brief indictment of what debut author and illustrator Stevenson sees as the global economy's endemic corruption. Read full book review >
THE GUNNING OF AMERICA by Pamela Haag
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches."
An examination of the controversial realm of American gun culture through the perspective of gun manufacturers, with an emphasis on the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Read full book review >

RESKILLING AMERICA by Katherine S. Newman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A top-notch, highly accessible contribution to the business and popular economics literature."
Now that the tide of outsourcing employment has begun to turn, the time has come to think about how to reverse chronic unemployment among youth in the United States. Read full book review >
CALLINGS by Dave Isay
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"Inspiring, insightful, and thoroughly readable."
A distinguished public radio producer's collection of conversations with Americans who "found…their way to doing exactly what they were meant to do with their lives." Read full book review >
PANIC AT THE PUMP by Meg Jacobs
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A readable and neatly paced examination of recent history that sheds light on even more recent events."
Political economist Jacobs (Woodrow Wilson Center/Princeton Univ.; Pocketbook Politics: Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America, 2005, etc.) considers the effects of the 1970s OPEC embargoes on subsequent politics.Read full book review >
AND THE WEAK SUFFER WHAT THEY MUST? by Yanis Varoufakis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A defensive but astute, cerebral, and engrossing polemic that conveys knowledge and authority."
The former Greek finance minister argues that the lack of political will and democratic consensus in the euro crisis portends a drift toward authoritarianism. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Lively storytelling about complex theories and arcane dealmaking."
A journalist who has covered multibillion-dollar corporate mergers and acquisitions, many of them hostile, recounts how the dealmaking exploded onto the Wall Street scene during the 1970s and '80s. Read full book review >
DISRUPTED by Dan Lyons
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"An exacting, excoriating takedown of the current startup 'bubble' and the juvenile corporate culture it engenders."
An inside-out look at the frenzied and at times surreal work environment of tech startup HubSpot. Read full book review >
Break Through to Yes by David B. Savage
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 22, 2016

"A valuable volume for the senior leader of any group, business, or organization who wants to build a collaborative culture."
A book thoroughly examines the power of successful collaborations. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >