Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 2)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 24, 2016

"An audacious and caustic financial work that deserves wide readership and close academic scrutiny."
A debut book delivers an appraisal of what ails Western economies. Read full book review >
NECESSARY TROUBLE by Sarah Jaffe
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"An essential guide to forces shaping our nation and the 2016 presidential election."
Journalist and Nation Institute fellow Jaffe debuts with an in-depth account of the wave of populist anger driving "a new era of protest and activism" in the United States. Read full book review >

THE NEW BETTER OFF by Courtney E. Martin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Martin writes with conviction and enthusiasm; whether social scientists concur with her remains to be seen."
An exploration of how success in the United States is being redefined. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A delightfully witty, enjoyable read."
A Brit living in the United States exposes the dark side of the happiness business in her adopted country. Read full book review >
Leading Up, Down and Across by Jochen Hekker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 20, 2016

"A practical guide to the fundamentals of effective leadership as well as an intriguing peek into Dutch military life."
A debut book offers leadership lessons from a former officer in the Netherlands armed forces. Read full book review >

THE TETRIS EFFECT by Dan Ackerman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An all-inclusive history behind one of the most popular video games ever."
How a simple computer game of cascading geometric shapes became a worldwide phenomenon. Read full book review >
PAYING THE PRICE by Sara Goldrick-Rab
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Necessary reading for anyone concerned about the fate of American higher education."
An examination of the "new economics of college in America." Read full book review >
Safety and Workers' Compensation Strategies by Adam Friedlander
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 26, 2016

"A book that will be useful for employers who are truly interested in improving worker productivity and company profits."
A workers' compensation consultant interviews business executives, lawyers, and others to show employers how to boost worker safety and the bottom line. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 30, 2016

"A maddening, important indictment of the shadow economy that flourishes even as the legitimate economy suffers and just the thing to tip a person debating whether to join the Occupy movement or vote for Bernie Sanders over the edge."
Hiding money in offshore accounts to keep it from the publicans is an old trick—but it is now so prevalent that, far from being "a minor part of our economic system," it is the system. Read full book review >
Improve Your Odds by Alan Yong
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 15, 2016

"A clearly worded handbook for covering the business basics."
A debut guide offers a systematic plan for entrepreneurs to improve their companies. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"A provocative guide that could embolden those with substantial debt to pursue evasive action; some consumers may not be comfortable with the volume's unconventional, sometimes confrontational approach."
An audacious playbook focuses on absolving one's debts. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2016

"A lightweight but engaging look back at days of long lunches and seemingly infinite expense accounts."
A retired adman shares tales of hawking everything from Tareyton cigarettes to the AT&T Yellow Pages in this debut memoir. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >