Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 28)

THE LEGEND OF COLTON H. BRYANT by Alexandra Fuller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2008

"A latter-day Silkwood, quiet and understated, beautifully written, speaking volumes about the priorities of the age."
A lyrical paean to an unsung…well, not exactly hero, but one of life's unsung people. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 2008

"An excellent exposition of key factors in a perennial economic conundrum."
How trade has evolved to impact nations and cultures in ways that are always dynamic but not always predictable. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 2008

"Practical, detailed and authoritative—essential reading."
An incisive look at global warming. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 2008

"Engler's plan may or may not stand much of a chance against world business leaders who retain an unshakeable belief in pure free-market capitalism, but his arguments will win many readers' sympathy."
Well-considered, revisionist analysis of the fierce debate about the future of our world economy. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 31, 2008

"Essential reading for anyone concerned about how dangerous pet food and children's clothing manufactured in China make it into American stores."
Financial Times reporter Harney paints a vivid portrait of factory life in the country that sells consumer goods for the lowest price possible. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 26, 2008

"Readable and vividly rendered—a near-definitive account of one of the most massive government interventions into domestic affairs in American history."
Breezy but well-considered account of the Works Progress Administration, the New Deal's signature jobs program. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"They know our irrational ways, too. Make a point of seeing this book. That way you'll know you want it, and you will."
Most people don't know what they want and don't know that they want it—until they see it and the reptilian brain kicks in. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 15, 2007

"A remarkable piece of historical analysis bound to provoke discussion and argument in foreign-policy circles."
A Council on Foreign Relations scholar examines the biggest geopolitical story of modern times: the birth, rise and continuing growth of Anglo-American power. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2007

"There's much more, all brilliantly reported, and the author lashes into cheerleaders of globalization's promise for the world's workers, advising them to go live like one of these 'nobodies.'"
A disturbing but important book about a shameful practice. Read full book review >
THE SHOCK DOCTRINE by Naomi Klein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 18, 2007

"Required reading for anyone trying to pierce the complexities of globalization."
Klein (Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate, 2002, etc.) tracks the forced imposition of economic privatization, rife with multinational corporate parasites, on areas and nations weakened by war, civil strife or natural disasters. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Berhman's sure grasp of the geo-politics, his firm understanding of the Plan's details and his deft portrayal of the men who made it work combine to forge a remarkable story."
A splendid narrative history of the Marshall Plan, perhaps the best foreign-policy idea America ever had. Read full book review >
THE PENTAGON by Steve Vogel
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 12, 2007

"Among books dealing with seemingly impossible engineering feats, this easily ranks with David McCullough's The Great Bridge and The Path Between the Seas, as well as Ross King's Brunelleschi's Dome."
A Washington Post military reporter brilliantly charts the conception, creation and history of the Pentagon, an architectural "monstrosity." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >