Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 28)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 10, 2003

"A monumental piece of work, stuffed to the gills with both clean and dirty secrets, certain to be de rigueur poolside reading in Beverly Hills this summer."
The story of MCA and its unrivaled influence on the culture and business of entertainment under perhaps the most powerful man about whom most Americans know nothing. Read full book review >
A MATHEMATICIAN PLAYS THE STOCK MARKET by John Allen Paulos
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 2003

"A first-rate exploration into the math of the market: heuristic numeracy at its best."
A severe investment miscalculation leads to valuable lessons about the tricky psychology and thorny arithmetic of the market. Read full book review >

DRY by Augusten Burroughs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2003

"Didn't think you'd ever feel even an ounce of sympathy for—let alone root for—a drunken adman, did you? Meet Mr. Burroughs."
Like the alcohol he so enjoys, Burroughs's story of getting dry will go straight into your bloodstream and leave you buzzing, exhilarated, and wiped out. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"The scientific status of VSL remains uncertain, but its creator's account of his investigations is irresistible."
A brash young cosmologist describes his attempts to redefine one of the keystones of relativity. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Respectful of both the old and the new cultures, rich in pro forma details and insider gossip alike, and likely to be required airplane reading in business class."
Pulitzer Prize-winning business reporter Anders (Health Against Wealth, 1996, etc.) crafts a highly readable account of the clash of cultures, gender, and styles that accompanied the changing of the guard at a leading computer manufacturer. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"A fascinating work of economic history that sheds light on daily life in the young Republic."
Thomas Jefferson died owing the equivalent of millions of dollars, while the richest man in revolutionary America did prison time for not paying his bills. "Debt was an inescapable fact of life in early America," writes Mann—a fact with considerable political and economic implications. Read full book review >
MEMOIRS by David Rockefeller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 22, 2002

"A memoir, rich as a Rockefeller, that should fire up historians, pundits, and commentators: every page raises unanswered questions about a remarkable life. (Photo insert, not seen)"
Mild-mannered plutocrat recalls some excellent adventures in a temperate, often candid text. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 7, 2002

"Brisk, bouncy, elastic, and exciting."
A fresh, frisky, and funny bio cum industrial history featuring the stereotypical monomaniacal inventor who ignores public opinion and the disdain of family and friends and lives long enough to enjoy seeing them all dine on substantial portions of crow. Read full book review >
CONFESSIONS OF A STREET ADDICT by James J. Cramer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

Wall Street's most notorious bull bares all in this typically over-the-top memoir. Read full book review >
OVER DOSE by Jay S. Cohen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

"A call and for action and a plan for it as well. Though not intended as a comprehensive reference, Over Dose is a source of useful drug information, much of it tabulated at chapter ends for easy consultation."
A well-planned and documented exposé of how pharmaceutical companies market drug information and how their one-size-fits-all dosage recommendations harm patients. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2001

"An appalling story of industry abuse and regulatory stupidity (and that's the generous reading)."
Have some lead with your french fries? Seattle Times reporter Wilson delivers a crackerjack investigative report on the toxic wastes in the fertilizer that helps grow the food on your table. Read full book review >
AVA’S MAN by Rick Bragg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A book that flashes with affection and respect for Charlie and the vanishing culture he represents, one we will be immensely the poorer for losing."
The story of a man who could charm a bird off a wire, beat the tar out of a threat, dandle a baby, tend a still, and smile—no, live—right through the meanest poverty the South could throw at him, from New York Times reporter and Pulitzer-winner Bragg (All Over But the Shoutin', 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >