Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 3)

PANIC AT THE PUMP by Meg Jacobs
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A readable and neatly paced examination of recent history that sheds light on even more recent events."
Political economist Jacobs (Woodrow Wilson Center/Princeton Univ.; Pocketbook Politics: Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America, 2005, etc.) considers the effects of the 1970s OPEC embargoes on subsequent politics.Read full book review >
AND THE WEAK SUFFER WHAT THEY MUST? by Yanis Varoufakis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A defensive but astute, cerebral, and engrossing polemic that conveys knowledge and authority."
The former Greek finance minister argues that the lack of political will and democratic consensus in the euro crisis portends a drift toward authoritarianism. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Lively storytelling about complex theories and arcane dealmaking."
A journalist who has covered multibillion-dollar corporate mergers and acquisitions, many of them hostile, recounts how the dealmaking exploded onto the Wall Street scene during the 1970s and '80s. Read full book review >
DISRUPTED by Dan Lyons
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"An exacting, excoriating takedown of the current startup 'bubble' and the juvenile corporate culture it engenders."
An inside-out look at the frenzied and at times surreal work environment of tech startup HubSpot. Read full book review >
Break Through to Yes by David B. Savage
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 22, 2016

"A valuable volume for the senior leader of any group, business, or organization who wants to build a collaborative culture."
A book thoroughly examines the power of successful collaborations. Read full book review >

Power by Julie Diamond
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 10, 2016

"An intensely readable field guide to using power without abusing it."
A book offers a taxonomy of the different kinds of power and a manual for understanding and employing it. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Although the author's well-delineated examples will ring outrageous to modern-day ears, she reminds us how much there is still to be achieved."
An elucidating study of landmark sex-discrimination cases waged in the wake of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Read full book review >
SMARTER FASTER BETTER by Charles Duhigg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Highly informative and entertaining and certain to have wide appeal."
Why some people are more productive than others. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"An authoritative account of the challenges facing progressives wishing to fuse better governance with economic justice."
An energetic if grim discussion of inequality and the coming era of underemployment, viewed through the lens of the forgotten American progressive narrative. Read full book review >
Marketing AI by Greg Grdodian
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 2, 2016

"A useful introduction to a new understanding of marketing made possible by the modern information revolution."
A wide-ranging account of how to maximize a business' success through marketing automation. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"The authors are necessarily forceful, and they offer a well-written must-read for those ready to give up hope about politics and government in the United States."
An examination of how "the rapid proliferation of a system akin to oligarchy—within our own country—threatens to cripple our march forward." Read full book review >
EVICTED by Matthew Desmond
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"This stunning, remarkable book—a scholar's 21st-century How the Other Half Lives—demands a wide audience."
A groundbreaking work on the central role of housing in the lives of the poor. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >