Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 3)

GRAND HOTEL ABYSS by Stuart Jeffries
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A rich, intellectually meaty history."
Life inside the 20th-century's reigning citadel of pessimism, as told through the lives and (often conflicting) philosophies of its key thinkers. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2016

"An insightful book that should be of interest to anyone who eats food, animal or not."
Unsentimental study of the dangers in how meat is produced and distributed around the world, particularly in the United States. Read full book review >

WEAPONS OF MATH DESTRUCTION by Cathy O'Neil
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An unusually lucid and readable look at the daunting algorithms that govern so many aspects of our lives."
How ill-conceived algorithms now micromanage America's economy, from advertising to prisons. Read full book review >
THE UPSIDE OF INEQUALITY by Edward Conard
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Unlikely to sway those for whom the idea of economic inequality is anathema, but a set of arguments worth considering."
Tax the rich? Even out the playing field? Bad idea, writes a famously contrarian financier. Read full book review >
THE CURSE OF CASH by Kenneth S. Rogoff
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Money geeks are the primary audience, to be sure, but futurists and trend-watchers will also take interest in the author's proposals for phasing out cash."
A noted economist imagines a modern society that functions without paper money and coins. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A thoughtful and enthusiastic analysis of how more and more people are inventing and creating truly remarkable products and services."
The story behind modern tinkerers, inventors, and creators of all sorts of good stuff. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 24, 2016

"An audacious and caustic financial work that deserves wide readership and close academic scrutiny."
A debut book delivers an appraisal of what ails Western economies. Read full book review >
NECESSARY TROUBLE by Sarah Jaffe
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"An essential guide to forces shaping our nation and the 2016 presidential election."
Journalist and Nation Institute fellow Jaffe debuts with an in-depth account of the wave of populist anger driving "a new era of protest and activism" in the United States. Read full book review >
THE NEW BETTER OFF by Courtney E. Martin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Martin writes with conviction and enthusiasm; whether social scientists concur with her remains to be seen."
An exploration of how success in the United States is being redefined. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A delightfully witty, enjoyable read."
A Brit living in the United States exposes the dark side of the happiness business in her adopted country. Read full book review >
Leading Up, Down and Across by Jochen Hekker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 20, 2016

"A practical guide to the fundamentals of effective leadership as well as an intriguing peek into Dutch military life."
A debut book offers leadership lessons from a former officer in the Netherlands armed forces. Read full book review >
THE TETRIS EFFECT by Dan Ackerman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An all-inclusive history behind one of the most popular video games ever."
How a simple computer game of cascading geometric shapes became a worldwide phenomenon. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >