Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 3)

The Casual Mentor by Hank Hoppin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 14, 2015

"A worthy book about building closer relationships between management and frontline staff through casual mentoring."
Hoppin argues that informal mentoring programs are far more effective than organized, human resources-mandated workplace systems. Read full book review >
Corporate Prisoner by J. Paul Kingston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"Dramatic testimony and useful guidance about the art and anguish of career management."
A former bank vice president shares his corporate travails, his transition to self-employment, and general business advice in this debut memoir and self-help guide. Read full book review >

THE INNER LIVES OF MARKETS by Ray Fisman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoughtful examination of the mechanics of our one-click world."
How economic theories power our market-driven lives. Read full book review >
Marketing AI by Greg Grdodian
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 2, 2016

"A useful introduction to a new understanding of marketing made possible by the modern information revolution."
A wide-ranging account of how to maximize a business' success through marketing automation. Read full book review >
THE RISE AND FALL OF NATIONS by Ruchir Sharma
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Evenhanded, measured, sage advice on the global economy."
This efficient, positive guide for the practical observer and investor shows how to choose healthy emerging markets. Read full book review >

AND THE WEAK SUFFER WHAT THEY MUST? by Yanis Varoufakis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A defensive but astute, cerebral, and engrossing polemic that conveys knowledge and authority."
The former Greek finance minister argues that the lack of political will and democratic consensus in the euro crisis portends a drift toward authoritarianism. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO THE POISONED CHALICE by James K. Galbraith
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"A book best read by policy wonks of a numerate bent but accessible to noneconomists as well."
A series of essays, letters, and other documents examining the latest Greek tragedy. Read full book review >
MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING by William N. Goetzmann
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 2016

"For the numerate and fiscally wonky, an accessible survey that does a fine job of reallocating past, present, and future."
A financial economist's view of credit, investment, speculation, and other matters of the pocketbook. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"Indian casinos are likely to be around for a long time to come, and Mitchell's exposé goes a long way toward explaining the whys and hows."
That casino on the nearby reservation? Think of it as revenge for Christopher Columbus, as some wags have put it—but also a sophisticated operation that makes use of every legal loophole available. Read full book review >
FAMINE, AFFLUENCE, AND MORALITY by Peter Singer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 2, 2015

"A useful compendium of a seminal article and its offshoots, and it couldn't be timelier."
A distinguished philosopher offers his past and present thinking on the subject of moral obligations that members of affluent societies have to those living in extreme poverty. Read full book review >
WHO COOKED ADAM SMITH'S DINNER? by Katrine Marçal
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 6, 2016

"An exciting reassessment of the global economy that provocatively extends the frontiers of the feminist critique."
A Swedish political and economic writer shows why "feminism's best-kept secret is just how necessary a feminist perspective is in the search for a solution to our mainstream economic problems. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 2016

"Whitaker proves herself a genial, informed companion for a journey toward 'creative flexibility.'"
How to foster creativity in any workplace. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >