Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 4)

STONED by Aja Raden
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"A lively, incisive cultural and social history."
A jewelry designer and historian's account of how the desire for diamonds, gold, and other precious stones and metals has shaped history. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A somewhat superficial yet entertaining romp."
Where to find innovators. Read full book review >

THE GREAT SURGE by Steven Radelet
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"With strong global leadership, writes the author, these hopeful trends will continue. A good book for policymakers and readers interested in global current affairs."
An optimistic report on the unprecedented recent economic progress of the world's developing nations. Read full book review >
THE CON MEN by Terry Williams
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A thoroughly researched academic study accessible to general readers."
Two sociology professors' survey of New York con artists and how these reviled but crafty opportunists manage to make a living in the city's informal economy. Read full book review >
The Abolition of Cash by David R. Warwick
Released: July 8, 2015

"A spirited argument to move beyond a cherished American institution, the physical dollar, into a digital payment future."
An intriguing, balanced study of a future cashless society. Read full book review >

Cycles of Intuition by I. Kostika
Released: June 10, 2015

"A business fable uses transition in a family-run company as a catalyst for analysis and insight."
A father and son evaluate the operations of their family business. Read full book review >
Shift by Haydn Shaughnessy
Released: Jan. 12, 2015

"Engages some worthwhile themes, often tangled in dense prose."
A scholarly look at how technology has radically transformed the world of commerce, coupled with advice for how to navigate this new landscape. Read full book review >
What the Enemy Thinks by Gail Picco
Released: July 30, 2015

"Overdrawn yet readable portrait of collective advocacy and friendship at work, spearheaded by a valiant, relatable protagonist."
Former women's shelter counselor Picco, in her debut, traces the intertwining business and personal lives of an altruistic media consultancy executive. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"As we head into the presidential primary season, Greenberg's book couldn't be timelier, more disturbing for the Republicans, or more challenging for those looking to lead the Democrats."
A prominent Democratic strategist and pollster lays out a reform agenda for the future. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"A levelheaded, well-researched analysis of the many 'trappings of contemporary breastfeeding culture.'"
The pros and cons of using breast milk instead of formula for your baby. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Moving in a stringent chronology, the author's impressive nuts-and-bolts account finds Churchill's golden years crowned by selling his memoirs and film rights."
Just when you thought there could not be another angle to this endlessly fascinating character, here's a serious, thorough look at Winston Churchill's lifelong struggle to pay the bills. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 17, 2015

"The author is not much of a prose stylist, but he gives enough historical evidence to back the theory that political and social change are in the hands of activists willing to make a stand against conventional practices."
Thoughts on how "alternative institutions" could revamp American society. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >