Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 4)

FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY by Sam Polk
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 19, 2016

"A heartfelt and cautionary success story incorporating both the deceptive promises of wealth and the life-changing power of self-awareness."
A former Wall Street hedge fund trader's transformative turnabout from greed to philanthropy. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Not the how-to book that its title suggests but Fish presents a compelling argument about the necessity of argument."
The acclaimed literary theorist and law professor addresses the concept of argument. Read full book review >

THE INEVITABLE by Kevin Kelly
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Kelly's arguments ring true, and his enthusiasm is contagious. Readers will enjoy the ride provided they forget that he has disobeyed his warning against assuming that today's trends will continue."
That futurists have a terrible record hasn't discouraged them, and this delightful addition to the genre does not deny that predictions have been wildly off-base. Read full book review >
FRACKOPOLY by Wenonah Hauter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"There is no question where Hauter's sympathies lie, and her grim litany of greed, corruption, and environmental damage may stir activists to action but deeply discourage general readers."
An angry polemic on fracking and the importance of "leaving fossil fuels in the ground and reorienting the production and use of electricity." Read full book review >
The Casual Mentor by Hank Hoppin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 14, 2015

"A worthy book about building closer relationships between management and frontline staff through casual mentoring."
Hoppin argues that informal mentoring programs are far more effective than organized, human resources-mandated workplace systems. Read full book review >

Corporate Prisoner by J. Paul Kingston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"Dramatic testimony and useful guidance about the art and anguish of career management."
A former bank vice president shares his corporate travails, his transition to self-employment, and general business advice in this debut memoir and self-help guide. Read full book review >
THE INNER LIVES OF MARKETS by Ray Fisman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoughtful examination of the mechanics of our one-click world."
How economic theories power our market-driven lives. Read full book review >
Marketing AI by Greg Grdodian
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 2, 2016

"A useful introduction to a new understanding of marketing made possible by the modern information revolution."
A wide-ranging account of how to maximize a business' success through marketing automation. Read full book review >
THE RISE AND FALL OF NATIONS by Ruchir Sharma
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Evenhanded, measured, sage advice on the global economy."
This efficient, positive guide for the practical observer and investor shows how to choose healthy emerging markets. Read full book review >
AND THE WEAK SUFFER WHAT THEY MUST? by Yanis Varoufakis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A defensive but astute, cerebral, and engrossing polemic that conveys knowledge and authority."
The former Greek finance minister argues that the lack of political will and democratic consensus in the euro crisis portends a drift toward authoritarianism. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO THE POISONED CHALICE by James K. Galbraith
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"A book best read by policy wonks of a numerate bent but accessible to noneconomists as well."
A series of essays, letters, and other documents examining the latest Greek tragedy. Read full book review >
MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING by William N. Goetzmann
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 2016

"For the numerate and fiscally wonky, an accessible survey that does a fine job of reallocating past, present, and future."
A financial economist's view of credit, investment, speculation, and other matters of the pocketbook. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >