Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 4)

MANAGING FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY by Goski Alabi
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 19, 2016

"An impressive history of quality management with questionable practical applications."
An analytical study of modern quality management that includes a comprehensive history of its practice. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A jargon-heavy, superficial primer on altered states tuned to a specific audience."
Two researchers survey the various ways that human beings alter their consciousness to improve performance. Read full book review >

SEASTEADING by Joe Quirk
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"While the authors' enthusiasm should be taken with more than a grain of salt, they raise ideas worth considering and offer hope for a future when life on land has grown grim."
The founder and communications director of the Seasteading Institute make a case that the survival of the planet depends on moving out from the land onto the sea. Read full book review >
TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

"Occasionally wise, intriguing, and even thought-provoking, this economics book remains generally uneven and amorphous."
A treatise explores a different way of looking at economics. Read full book review >

SENSEMAKING by Christian Madsbjerg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"The author employs jargon, to be sure, but he explains each piece of jargon with admirable clarity."
A business consultant argues for the importance of learning through human interactions rather than always emphasizing computer-generated data. Read full book review >
A GENERATION OF SOCIOPATHS by Bruce Cannon Gibney
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"'This is a deeply negative portrayal, but a certain negativity may be what's required.' Maybe so, but if this polemic makes wounded millennials feel better, it likely won't reach older ears, who may be more sympathetic than Gibney imagines."
A cri de coeur against baby boomers, who "unraveled the social fabric woven by previous generations in the interests of sheer selfishness." Read full book review >
UTOPIA FOR REALISTS by Rutger Bregman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Raise the minimum wage? No. Give everyone a basic income, smash the machines, and work a couple of days per week—that's the ticket. A provocative pleasure to contemplate."
A spirited and practical manifesto for improving the odds of making a heaven on Earth. Read full book review >
EVERYTHING UNDER THE HEAVENS by Howard W. French
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A lucid if stolid overview of regional history, useful for students of Pacific affairs in playing out scenarios of what might happen next."
A long-view look at events that are making China's neighbors—and much of the world beyond—very nervous indeed. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Full of object lessons, this is a valuable overview for students of international commerce."
There are new markets to share out there, and the old capitalist way of doing things won't be the one that captures them. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A strong case that deserves a wider readership than just policy wonks."
An examination of economic inequality—unsurprisingly, the title refers to race as well as economic class. Read full book review >
IRRESISTIBLE by Adam Alter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A clearly written account of a widespread social malady that is sure to gain further attention in coming years."
How interactive technologies facilitate newly debilitating addictions. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >