Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 5)

THE CON MEN by Terry Williams
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A thoroughly researched academic study accessible to general readers."
Two sociology professors' survey of New York con artists and how these reviled but crafty opportunists manage to make a living in the city's informal economy. Read full book review >
THE COSMOPOLITES by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A slim but powerful book of great interest to students of international law and current events."
Swiss-Canadian-Iranian journalist Abrahamian looks closely at modern internationality and the legal liminality that can accompany it. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 9, 2015

"A forthright, inspirational account of a businessman's spiritual struggles."
A successful entrepreneur recounts his quest to find happiness and God in this debut book. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A must for car lovers and plenty of interesting material to keep other curious readers flipping pages."
A chronicle of the frantic, ultracompetitive, and heroic early days of automobile manufacturing. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A compelling examination of a still-vilified monetary policy that has continued to show results in spite of conservative criticism."
An accessible economic study of Franklin Roosevelt's daringly effective monetary policy in the face of the Depression. Read full book review >

Make The World Your Oyster by Michael Lum
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"A vivid tale about sea creatures that highlights the need for strategic risk-taking."
Two dolphins contemplate midlife career moves in this business parable. Read full book review >
AMERICA'S BANK by Roger Lowenstein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"Lowenstein doubts the Federal Reserve Act could be passed in today's volatile political climate, but he provides an unusually lucid history of our nation's central bank."
The story of the creation of the Federal Reserve. Read full book review >
A FIELD PHILOSOPHER'S GUIDE TO FRACKING by Adam Briggle
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 19, 2015

"Goliath takes it right between the eyes in this unique take on the convoluted politics, science, and cultural issues at stake regarding fracking."
Out of the university and into the streets, Briggle (Philosophy/Univ. of North Texas) brings the practice of "field philosophy" to the question of whether fracking is feckless or feasible. Read full book review >
Marketing For Tomorrow, Not Yesterday by Zain Raj
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 16, 2015

"A well-written, cogent, and concise argument that demonstrates ways to cope with the changing marketing landscape."
A longtime marketing practitioner challenges his colleagues to adjust to a new economy in this nonfiction book. Read full book review >
THE 3rd WAY by Upendra Chivukula
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 15, 2015

"A serious, rigorous contribution to the debate over how to rescue a drowning middle class."
An ambitious book offers a radical proposal to save capitalism by exponentially increasing the number of capitalists. Read full book review >
ECONOMICS RULES by Dani Rodrik
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A hopeful contribution to the reconstitution of a profession whose reputation has been seriously damaged, both fairly and unfairly."
Rodrik (Economics and Social Sciences/Princeton Institute For Advanced Studies; The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy, 2011, etc.) challenges both his professional colleagues and broader public opinion regarding his much-maligned field.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Superb scholarship and a sprightly style recover an unaccountably overlooked life in our history."
A specialist in African-American history pieces together the remarkable career of an antebellum Wall Street broker who was married to a white woman, ambitious, ruthless, successful, and black: in short, "a racist's nightmare come to life." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >