Business & Economics Book Reviews (page 5)

FAMINE, AFFLUENCE, AND MORALITY by Peter Singer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 2, 2015

"A useful compendium of a seminal article and its offshoots, and it couldn't be timelier."
A distinguished philosopher offers his past and present thinking on the subject of moral obligations that members of affluent societies have to those living in extreme poverty. Read full book review >
STONED by Aja Raden
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"A lively, incisive cultural and social history."
A jewelry designer and historian's account of how the desire for diamonds, gold, and other precious stones and metals has shaped history. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"A clearheaded and invaluable walk-through of how to handle money and make it work for an investor."
A short, comprehensive coaching manual explains the intricacies of personal investment. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"Rock-solid evidence on the rise of identity theft and the multiple steps one can take to counteract an attack."
Useful advice on protecting your identity. Read full book review >
Viral Leadership by Jorge Acuña
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 19, 2015

"A book that offers solid strategy tips for striving leaders."
A training consultant discusses how to become an effective and "infectious" leader in this debut business guide. Read full book review >

THE CON MEN by Terry Williams
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A thoroughly researched academic study accessible to general readers."
Two sociology professors' survey of New York con artists and how these reviled but crafty opportunists manage to make a living in the city's informal economy. Read full book review >
THE COSMOPOLITES by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A slim but powerful book of great interest to students of international law and current events."
Swiss-Canadian-Iranian journalist Abrahamian looks closely at modern internationality and the legal liminality that can accompany it. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 9, 2015

"A forthright, inspirational account of a businessman's spiritual struggles."
A successful entrepreneur recounts his quest to find happiness and God in this debut book. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A must for car lovers and plenty of interesting material to keep other curious readers flipping pages."
A chronicle of the frantic, ultracompetitive, and heroic early days of automobile manufacturing. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A compelling examination of a still-vilified monetary policy that has continued to show results in spite of conservative criticism."
An accessible economic study of Franklin Roosevelt's daringly effective monetary policy in the face of the Depression. Read full book review >
Make The World Your Oyster by Michael Lum
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"A vivid tale about sea creatures that highlights the need for strategic risk-taking."
Two dolphins contemplate midlife career moves in this business parable. Read full book review >
AMERICA'S BANK by Roger Lowenstein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"Lowenstein doubts the Federal Reserve Act could be passed in today's volatile political climate, but he provides an unusually lucid history of our nation's central bank."
The story of the creation of the Federal Reserve. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >